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To awaken fond memories 
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To inspire those who come 




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To give pleasure to those 


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^ To perpetuate forever the 
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PiNB Knot for 1925. 




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INTERIOR VIEW OF PARLOR 




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INTERIOR VIEW OF LOBBY 



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The Pine Knot ^ :E ' 



Into the Future 

Our Alma iMater! How we love it! How proud we are to have been one of 
the many who have made it what it is. Its ageing bricks, its worn floors, its 
name-scratched walls, all ha\'e their indelible place in our hearts. 



But it will change; it must change, and in our love we dream great things for 
this A. C. C. of ours. It will be years — few or many? — before our vision mate- 
rializes. We see what we now wish for: a larger campus, with paved driveways, 
beautiful shrubbery, attractive walks, and comfortable benches. In this lovely 
Southern climate of ours. Nature's great out-of-doors is our playground in which 
to receive the rich blessings of beaut}-. 

What more do we see? Our greatest need — adequate buildings, with modem 
equipment for research work; a library of several thousand books; an auditorium 
with many comfortable seats and a stage to delight the heart of a professional; 
reception rooms; large, airy bedrooms, with private sitting rooms adjoining. 



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This is our dream! How short is the time we stay here, but long enough 
to instill in our hearts the desire to see our college grow, and the determination 
to make our dreams come true. 



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Eleven 



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PRESIDENT HOWARD STE\-E.\,S HILLEY 



Twelve 



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President Howard S. Hilley 



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Among the prominent men whose names ha\'e recently been associated with 
A. C. C.'s growth and development, the foremost figure has been that of Pres- 
ident Hilley. He has the welfare of the college as his one big objective in life. 
It is his aim and desire to make Atlantic Christian College one of the first insti- 
tutions of the South, capable of accomplishing the great tasks which he has before it. 

Since he came here, about seven years ago, steady progress has been made 
in the affairs of the college. The student body has grown, until now the build- 
ings are taxed to their utmost capacity with students. The Library has been 
increased, and the general standard of instruction has been raised so that it is 
now a credit to the Disciples of Christ in North Carolina. We predict even great- 
er changes for the future, for President Hilley is a man of great executive ability, 
common sense, and with an unfaltering faith, both in his work and humanity. 



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Thirteen 



Faculty 





Laura Jennie Beach, A. B. 
Professor of Languages 



Perry Case, A. B., B. D. 
Professor of Religious Education 





WlI-BIE S. HiNEGARDNER, A. B., A. M. 

Professor of Science 



Frances F. Harper, A. B. 
Professor of Malhemalics 



Fourlccn 



Faculty 



i4 





Frederick F. Grim, A. .M. 
Professor of Education 



Mrs. Mable C. Case, A. B. 
Associate Professor of English 





Mrs. W. T. Mattox, A. B. 
Associate Professor of English 



W. T. Matto.x, a. M., B. D. 
Professor of Philosophy 



Fifteen 



Faculty 





C. C. Wake 
General .Sccrelarv 



Roger M. McC.irt, A. B. 
Professor of Physics 





Myrtie L. Harper 
Librarian 



Mrs. Allen R. Moore 
Dean of Women 



Sixteen 



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Senior Ckss Officers 

Mae Stancill President 

Dolly Lewis Vice President 

Agnes Cobb Secretary 

Everett Harris Treasurer 

Parron Gallop Historian 

Vivian Holden Prophet 

Al Heath Mayfield Poet 

Agnes Cobb Testator 






Seventeen 



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Agnes Cobb 



Ruth J. Skinner 



AGNES COBB 

Wilson, M. C. 

1924-25 Secretary Senior Class, Secretary Alethian Society 

Agnes, "our little Senior," is another one of our Wilson girls. Although she will admit that 
there are many things she would rather do than study (for instance, talk to John), you really 
would not know this from her marks. Agnes does nothing extreme, and yet does everything 
well. On short acquaintance, she may seem quiet, but after knov^ing her better, one sees that 
she is talkative and full of fun. She is usually smiling and always friendly. 

" Never trouble troutile 'til trouble troubles you" 



RUTH J. SKIXXER 

F.\RMVILLE, N. C. 

1922-23— Secretary of H. L.S., Chairman World Fflloivship Committee of I". IP. C. A.; 1923-2 Jf— 
Secretary of Fellowship Club, Vice President H. L. S., Chairman Program Committee Y. W. C. A., 
Member Religious Education Committee, Assistant Business Manager Pine Knot; 1924-25 — 
Winner of Faculty Loving Cup, President Y. W. C. A., President Athletic Association, Critic II. 
L. S., Assistant Editor Pine Knot, Debater II. L. S. 

Ruth has a good personality, an indomitable will, tact, and common sense. She is self- 
expressive, persistent, modest, sensible, courageous, versatile, and practical. She is loved by 
all — professors and students. She is a very enthusiastic leader. She is a s;hclar of rare ability. 
Her future is promising. 

" To improve one's mind — ah, that is a worthy ambition" 



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Eighteen 



'^H's Pine 




Vivian Holden 



Dolly Louse Lewis 



VIVIAN HOLDEN 
Wilson, N. C. 
1934-25~Prophel of Senior Class 

"She is wise, if I can judge her, and fair she is, if mine eyes be true!" But that is not all 
Vivian is. She is a real "honest to goodness" girl. She never pushes herself forward, but she 
is ready to do her part in anything, at any time. One never asks "Vive" to do something and 
meets with a refusaL 

She possesses sympathy — that rare quality which makes a friend. She can laugh with the 
happy, weep with the weary, and as a specialty, she can love with lovers. All in all, she is just 
the kind of girl one cannot forget. 



DOLLY LOUISE LEWIS 

Wilson, N. C. 

1924-25 — Vice President Senior Class, Critic of A. L. S. 

Dolly is the type of girl that we all like. Confiding, affectionate, sincere, and faithful, with 
a keen sense of humor and a deep feehng for the finer things of life — this is our Dolly. She is 
one of the truest friends a girl ever had. Her winning ways and her ability to prove her friend- 
ship have won for her a place in many hearts — both among the students and the professors. 
We are sure she will succeed in whatever she decides to make her life's work. 

" Not too sober, not too gay, but a true blue girl in every way" 



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Nineteen 



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1-1 




Reba M. Stubbs 



Mae Stancill 






REBA M. STUBBS 

Wilson, N. C. 

1923-24 — President Phi Sigma Tau Sorority; 1924-25 — Assistant Business Manager of Pine 
Knot. 

Reba is a genuine girl. For four years she has gladdened our hearts with her merry smile 
and contagious enthusiasm. Though we love her, we are tempted to envy her, for the gods 
were unusually kind in giving her beauty, dramatic ability, and a charming personality. Her's 
i !a life that will find happiness in everything and everywhere. 

"Her eyes are stars of twilight fair. 
Like twilight, too, her dusky hair." 



MAE STANCILL 

Washington, N. C. 

1924-25 — Secretary II. L. S., President Senior Class, President Sigma Tau Chi Sorority, 
President A-1 Club. 

Our President, Mae! Capable, energetic, and tactful. We admire her for her loyalty to 
her school, to her class, and to her friends: we love her for her beauty of character and constancy 
of purpose. Being a friend to all has made for her a host of friends. We can truly say with 
Wordsworth : 

• ".'1 perfect woman, nobly planned. 
To warn, to comfort, and command" 



Twenty 



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Margaret Louise Tomlinsox 



Parkox G. Gallop 



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MARGARET LOUISE TOMLINSdX 

Wilson-, X. C. 
1924-35— Wit Editor of the Pine Knot 

Louise is one of these students who take eoUege life more or less seriously — whieh is why we 
arc inclined to believe her when she tells us that she is going to take her !\I. A. at Columbia. 
A girl of high as;-irations is our Louise. Truly a pursuer of knowledge for the sake of knowledge, 
a student in love with her studies. 

But this is only part of what w-e like about Louise. Unfailing, loyal, sincere, frank, ready 
always to sacrifice her own pleasure to that of others — these arc the qualities we value most. 
Although quiet and unassuming, her friends find her soimd as tlie finest of metals. 

We know slic is going to succeed. We wish her happiness. 

" To those who kiiozv thee not, iw words can puint. 
And those who know thee know that words arc faint" 



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PARR(J\ G. GALLOP 
Jarvisbirg, X. C. 
1922-23 — ir/»)7(T pf Intcr-Socicty Oratorical Medal, Secretary of A 



-President of Junior Class; 19,.'.'f-Jd- 



L. S.. President of A. L. S., 
Dramatic Editor of PiNE Knot, 



Manager of Football; 1923-2i- 
Ilislorian of Senior Class. 

Parron came to A. C. C. four years ago. He is interested in all student activities. He is 
a main star on the football field. Part of his leisure time he spends in discussing great orators. 
During his Freshman year he won the inter-society Oratorical Contest. This year he repre- 
sented the Alethian Literary Society in the annual debate. We find him difficult to understand 
at times, but once understood, we have in him a staunch friend. His chief asset is confidence. 

" They can who think they can" 



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Twenty-one 



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LiLL WiNSTEAD 



Charlie Grey Raile.v 



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LILL WINSTEAD 
Elm City, N. C. 
1921-S2 — Chairman Y. W. Finance Committee; 1922-23 — Chairman Y. W. Social Service, 
Y. W. C. A. Delegate to Montreal: i:)2.i-J.',~Secretary Wilson County Club; 1924-25— Vice Presi- 
dent Y. W. C. A., Student Chairman Red Cross Work. 

Lill has the reputation of always doing the right thing at the right time. She is well known 
on the campus for her share in the many activities of school life. Lill is always ready to <lo her 
part in any worthy undertaking. She has never let her studies interfere with an all-'round col- 
lege course, and is a typical Senior in every way. 

".-1 heart as soft, a heart as kind. 
As in the whole world thou canst find" 

CHARLIE GREY RAULEN 

WiLSO.N-, X. C. 

1921-22—Treasurer of A. L. S., Debater for A. L. S., I'ice President of Dramatic Club; 1922 
23 — President of Dramatic Club, Pianist of A. L. S., Art Editor of Pine Knot, Secretary and Treas- 
urer of Class, Chairman of Program Committee of A. L. S.; 192S-2Jf — President of Wilson County 
Club, Debater for A. L. S., Chairman of Program Committee of A. L. S., Art Editor of Pine Knot; 
1924-2.5— President of A. L. S., Editor-in-Chief of the Pine Knot. 

We are told by the seers of old that the fairies attend the christening of souls. In the great 
throng of good fairies each contributes his favorite gift, Ijut usually certain worthless trophies 
may be later discarded. Not so with our Charlie Grey. Judging from her extraordinary tal- 
ents, all of her fairies were true and noble. The versatility of her mind exhibits itself through 
many channels. Truly, music has its charms in her young life, for, as a music lover, she has 
dedicated her services as accompanist to amateur aspirants in the realm of son?. Her dramatic 
achievements have been instrumental in winning for her scores of friends. For does not the 
world offer laurels to an entertainer who can make sad hearts light and free, fatigued minds 
exhilarant and add renewed charm to living? Last, but not least, her literary abilities have 
reached the acme of success in the greatest venture of her life — Editor-in-Chief of the Pine Knot. 

As may be seen, in whatever realm she labors, success follows her pathway. 
" True worth is in being, not seeming" 



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Twenlv-two 






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Everett I. Harris 



Al Heath Mayfield 



EVERETT J. HARRIS 

Englehard, N. C. 

1923-23— Chaplain A. L. S., President Fellmcsliip Club, Member of Religious Editcalion Com- 
mittee; 1923-24 — yii^e President A. L. S., Business Manager Pine Knot, Manager of Baseball; 
1924-25 — President A. L. 5., Manager of Basket Ball, Manager of Baseball, Treasurer of Senior Class. 

His face shows the strength of his manly character. Eyes that do not waver in facing a prob- 
lem; a mouth whose firmness portrays his indomitable will. He seeks the truth, he speaks it 
with conviction. Preparing for a life work that will call upon him for all tasks, both pleasant 
and unpleasant, has made him patient — an enviable quality. 

"/ would be humble, for I know my weakness; 
I would look up, and laugh, and love, and lift" 



AL HEATH MAYFIELD 

Austin, Te.xas 

1921-24 — University of Texas 

Al comes to us from Te.\as University to receive his degree. In these short months he has 
won for himself many friends. He is a man among men, not only in size, but in intellect. He 
is a lion among the ladies, admired by all, but like the butterfly, flits quickly from one fair flower 
to another. 

" Common sense in an uncommon degree is what the world calls wisdom" 



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Twenty-three 



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Senior History 






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At last, after years of <,'enuine labor on the part of 
each indi\idual composing the class of 1925, the time 
has come when such labor must be rewarded. Gone 
are the days when any member can recover one lost 
moment in which somethini; great or good could have 
been' accom]jlished. 

During the past four years we have Ijecn in train- 
ing for a worthy purpose, which is either to teach, to 
preach, or to be in other ways servants to our God in 
the upbviilding of humanity. During that time we 
have been guided by the principles and direction of 
this college, whose influence shall abide \\"itli us through- 
out the coming years. We have been benefited not 
only mentally, but also spiritually, moralh', and 
socially. 

It is my purpose to unveil for you a few outstanding 
characteristics of the ten whose ever}- ambition is to 
become some day leaders for good. 

Our class President, Alae vStancill, of Washington, 
possesses many charms. Our \'ice President, Dolly 
Lewis, is Wilson's c|ueen, a loan to us for these four 
years. \'ivian Holden, our prophet, is the beauty 



T'luenly-fonr 



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attraction of \Mlson and of A. C. C. Ruth Skmner, '•>■ 

song writer, and Farmville's future leader, has become 
a genuine suffragette. Parron Gallop, Historian, de- 
scribes himself as " Jarvisburg's bud that is about 
to bloom." Agnes Cobb. Secretary, is Wilson's most 
notable society belle. Charlie Grey Raulen is without 
doubt Wilson's most advanced actress and enter- ■ I? 

tainer. Louise Tomlinson, of Wilson, possesses marked 
ability in domestic art. Reba Stubbs, Wilson's school 
madam, is another attractive reader. Lill Winstead 
is Elm City's first-class artist. 

Now that we are leaving the college, we wish to 
acknowledge our debt to the students we have been 
associated with, and to the faculty for their patience 

and perseverance. Some day we shall be able to ij, 

tell you in words and deeds how much we really have 

appreciated your assistance, your patience, 3'our sym- (|; • 

pathy, and your love. 



Parron Gallop, Historian 






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Twenty-five 



Senior Class Prophecy 



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And it came to pass in the second month, on the se\-enth day of the month, 
in the fifth year of the reign of Howard of the house of Hilley. as I, Vivian, of the 
tribe of Seniors, was wandering in the wilderness of ologies and isms with other 
sojourners in the land of A. C. C, that the spirit of prophecy fell upon me, and I 
heard a voice saying, "Prophesy," and I lifted up my voice and prophesied con- 
cerning the fate of my fellow tribesmen. 

And lo, I behold before mine eyes a great multitude gathered before the door 
of a fair palace, and I saw a great sign, and on it in letters of fire the inscription: 

"Spice of 1934" 

Featuring 
Charlie Gray Raitlen 
with J . Park Ximn and other stars 

And in that da\' there arose among the people in that same country a certain 
wise man, Parron, son of Gallop, who, having in his heart the desire to become 
spokesman of his people, practiced diligently, even as did the great Demosthenes 
in his day. And lo, the people all barkened to the eloquence of his tongue and 
they elected him President of the United States. 

And among those who praised his name was one Everett of the renowned 
house of Harris, going about throughout all the land telling of his powers — and 
he spake unto the people, saying: "Hark ye unto the voice of this man, for he 
Cometh to deliver \'ou from the bondage of illiteracy, for in his administration 
shall be created a National Department of Education, and your public schools 
shall wax mightily in all the land." And the words of the campaign speaker 
pleased the great Parron, and calling all the wise men about him, he questioned 
them, saying, "How shall I reward one who hath served me long and faithfully'" 
And they consulted among themselves and made answer, saying, "Give unto _^| 

him the honor of being first National Secretary of Public Education, for he is a ]^| 

man of great wisdom." And he said, "It shall be so. " ■■ 

And a voice from among them spake aloud, though with fear and tremljling, 
for they stood in awe of the great Parron, saying unto him, "Master, she whom 
they call Ruth, of the city of Farmville, sends greetings. She desires me to say 
that though ye were once obnoxious to her. being her political rival and not of 
the party of Democrats, still, doth she will ye no evil, but willeth to be like unto 
a sister to you, counseling you with words of wisdom concerning the ruling of 
this great nation." And having given utterance to these words, he was silent, 
and the great Parron was pleased and answered, saying, "V^erily she is fair of 
face. I will make her First Lady of the Land." And the word went out among 
the people, and they were glad. 

And Lill, fair daughter of the house of Winstead. communed with herself, 
saying, "Behold, what profiteth it me that I should teach all the days of my life 



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Twenty-six 



in the city of Sharpsburg? Rather shall I take unto myself a husband." And 
having enticed a }'oung and innocent bridegroom, Joe by name, she departed 
with him and went into a far country. And all the Sharpsburgites lamented 
her departure for many days. 

Then Mae, the Washingtonite, seeing the example of her sister, said, "Lo, I 
will go and do likewise." And so saying, she decked herself in purple and fine 
linen and went forth to meet the bridegroom — and I looked, and behold, it was 
"Bill." 

And in my vision I beheld a room in which there were many little children, 
and in their midst one speaking to them in a heathen tongue. To her they all 
gave ear, for she spake as one having authority. And she lifted up her eyes, and 
beholding me, said, "Parlez-vous Francaise'" So hearing, I knew it to be Louise. 

Therefore, I questioned her with these words, "Wherefore find I you here with- 
out the companion of thy youth, Dolly, of the house of Lewis, for she loved thee 
well, and in those days would not depart from following after thee'" And she, 
answering, said unto me. "Verily I say unto thee, she hath not parted from me, 
but hath abode, lo, these many years in the house of my brother, Louis, first bom 
of my father's house. And they have waxed strong and mighty in the land of 
Wilson, being rich in many cattle and fertile fields." And I knew that it was 
well with her. 

And I turned in spirit to the land of A. C. C, which was the native land of 
the tribe of Seniors, and lo. there I beheld Agnes as she held with dignity and 
grace the chair of Mathematics, teaching theorems and comic sections to the fair 
youths and maidens of the land. And her praise was on every tongue, for she 
had been among them for many }'ears, guiding and directing them in the ways 
of higher mathematics. 

And I lifted up my voice and said, "Verily, fair is the fame of my classmates." 
And behold, the spirit of prophecy left me. Selah. 

Vivian Holden, Prophet 



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'81 



Twenlv-seven 



f. n e F" 



To the Seniors 



Just four brief j'ears! You leave the college! 

We trust that here you did receive 
Some noble rudiments of knowledge 

That evermore with you will live. 
Build more on these, and building, be 
E'er mindful of our A. C. C. 



The best we had to you we taught: 

The nobleness of Plato's Ijrain, 
Great Aristotle's mighty thought, 

Christ's love and peace, and Shakespeare's strain. 
Climb high yourselves, and climbing, be 
E'er mindful of our A. C. C. 



ii You leave us! Fare vou well! God speed! 

fc!'' vSuccess to all — our wish to you. 

4.1 Keep open minds, from fetters freed, 

^ci And love the good, the just, the true; 

tl', And think of us in years to be — 

E'er mindful of our A. C. C. 



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J. K. \V.\RRE.\ 



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SENIOR SNAPSHOTS 



T'lVcnty-nine 



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Last V/ill and Testament 



State of North Carolina 

County of Wilson '•]'] 



We, the Senior Class of Atlantic Christian College, of the session of 1924-25, 
being of sound mind and conscious of the transitory nature of our Senior dignity, 
do declare this to be our last will and testament : 



Section I 

Itevi I — To our faculty in general we give our appreciation of the lo\'aI sym- 
pathy and undying patience shown us by them during the past four years of our 
trials and tribulations, "joys, and what-nots, " and a sincere wish for their success 
in all fields of their' undertakings. 



; ' ill Item II — To the Junior Class we do hereby will and bequeath : 



(Ij The long envied Senior privileges, and may your progress be not so slow, 
jU but just as sure; (2) sympathy, but a word of courage as you tra\'el up the road 

1,1 to Senior heights. 

''), Item III — To the Sophomore Class we do hereby will and bequeath the ex- 

penses of the next Junior reception, together with a few dreams that they will 
be the learned Seniors that we now are. 



Iteu! I\' — To the Freshman Class we leave the high ideals that actuated our 
class in our vSophomore year and materialized, that which is no longer an antici- 
pation, but a realization — honored Seniors. 

Item 1 " — To the incoming Freshmen we devise and bequeath our colors. Green 
and White — colors that never run. 

Section II 

Itevi I — To our beloved President we lea\'e all the anxiety so impatiently 
I i, endured by us before examinations. ' 

! it 
; i| Item II — We do also bequeath to the aforementioned despot the necessary 

|l authority required to make each chapel service one hundred per cent in attendance. 

' f Item III — To our beloved librarian. Miss Myrtie, "who hath cast bread upon 

;, the waters," lo, these many years, we leave our love and appreciation in remem- 

brance of her many services so cheerfully gi\'en. 

We, the aforesaid Class of 1925, do hereby publish and declare this to be our 
last will and testament, hereby revoking all wills and testaments hitherto made 
by us at any time and solemnly affix our signature in presence of each other. 



Agnes Cobb, Testator 



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Thirty 



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Junior Class Ojficers 

Alfred Flanagan President 

Nannie Pearl Quinerly \'!ce President 

Janie Manning Secretary and Treasurer 

MiTTiE Wiggins Historian 

Walter B. F. Randolph Poet 



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i^sCr- 



Thirty-one 



The Pine Knot '2S 



Juniors 



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Paul Southard 



Macon Moore 



J. Park Nunn 



m 



PAUL SOUTHARIJ 
Stokesdale, N. C. 

Paul is one of the most 1:eloved raeml:iers of the Junior class. He is an energetic, loyal preach- 
er and student. He is pastor of the little West Em.l Cliristian Church, and is proving liimself 
a true "shepherd of his flock." 

" TJie world belongs lo the ciicrgclic" 



MACON MOORE 
Wilson, N. C. 

Macon Moore is a girl of wliom the Junior class is exceedingly proud. She has a clear in- 
tellect and a kind heart. She is dependable, resolute, and true. A. C. C. is fortunate to have her. 

"A quiet, earnest, upright girl, who meets the world with a brave, 'I can' . " 



It 



J. PARK NUNN 

KiNSTON, N. C. 

Park is the big little man of the Junior class. His office as Business Manacer of the Pine 
Knot expresses our confidence in him. He is a general favorite among both faculty and stu- 
dents. His soecial interest lies in English and Dramatics. Our class will ever remain proud 
of l"is al>i!ity in this work. 

"Small in stature, but often wise in judgment" 



Thirty-two 



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uniors 



I 




Janie Manning 



Alfrkd Flanagan 



Annie Harper 



JANIE MANNING 

Middlesex, N. C. 

In the sweetness and strengtli of her face we read the beauty and strength of her character; 

by the tones of her voice we know the gentleness of her disposition. Loved Ijy all as a friend, 

admired by all as a ready and willing worker, Janie will hold a permanent place in the hearts 

of her A. C. friends. 

"She has a voice of gladness, and a smile, 
And eloquence of beauty" 



If ;■ 



ALFRED FLANAGAN 
Fakmville, N. C. 
Alfred Flanagan will be long remembered by those of the Junior class as friend and President. 
Al has talents, among others being his ability to sing. On many occasions have we been de- 
lighted in hearing his melodious voice. A friend to all, and ever with a smile. Al — wc hail thee! 
" Talking, he knew not why, and cared not what" 

ANNIE HARPER 
Wilson, N. C. 
Annie is thoroughly incapable of doing anything wrong or questionable. She is sober-minded, 
and never becomes wild with joy over anything. Though not a dormitory student, she takes 
great interest in all college activities, and is always willing to do her part. She is a faithful church 
worker, and never hesitates when duty calls. All agree that she is one of the most likeable mem- 
bers of the Junior class. 

"How e're it be, it seems to me, 
'Tis only noble to be good" 



s3 



Thirty-three 



Juniors 



m 







LosKER Bennett 



Nannie Pearl Quinerly Walter B. F. Randolph 



LOSKER BENNETT 
Arapahoe, N. C. 
Losker, one of A. C. C.'s most enthusiastic students, hails from the little city of Arapahoe. 
Entering here in the fall of 1920, he has been a regular attendant until Christmas of 1924, when 
he was married to Miss Sarah Herring of Goldsboro. 

As a student preacher, every week-end Losker went on a missionary tour in some part of 
Eastern North Carolina. There are few who surpass him in devotion to what they feel to be 
right. 

"Duly is the suhtimesi word in the English language; one cannot do more than his duty, nor should 
he desire to do less. 

NANNIE PEARL QUINERLY 

Grifton, N. C. 

We are expecting even greater things of Nannie Pearl during her Senior year. For three 

years she has proven herself efficient in all types of work. She is quite an asset to the religious 

and social life of the college. She is a true and loyal girl, whom we admire for her ability, her 

willingness, and her cheerfulness. 

" The secret of being loved is in being lovely; and the secret of being lovely is in being unselfish." 

WALTER B. F.. RANDOLPH 
Washington, N. C. 
For Walter there is nothing more fascinating than the great universe of science. His atti- 
tude toward a subject is that of curiosity and interest. In the religious side of life he is very 
active and enthusiastic. Much of his leisure time is spent in the city engineer's office, and the 
remainder in the laboratory exploring the great material works of God in His universe. Walter's 
philosophy seems to be this: "If it cannot be solved with science, the fault is in the science. I 
am going to find that fault and make a contribution to the world." 

" // having a gift toward a field of work has anything to do with success, he will win. " 



f 

a 



ill' 



f 












i 



Thirlv-four 



The Pine Knot '2S 



,ggs^5:ftSL5&- 



'Tgf'''^;^ff**stT r^'*- : 



Juniors 




i'M 1 ^ > • AM i i 

Belva Adkins 



« 




Charles James 



MiTTUC WlliGINS 



BELVA ADKINS 
Wilson, M. C. 

Bclva is one of the college "babies," not in age, but in size. Although she is so small, she 
has a great spirit, which makes her liked by all. She- is quite an artist, and is very entertain- 
ing at her work, especially in class. 

"How far thai little candle throws his beams.' 
So shines a good deed in a naughty world" 

CHARLES JAMES 
Rural H.\ll, \. C. 

The memory of Charles will be with us many years after he leaves the college. Courteous, 
willing, obliging, and similar adjectives describe his personality; grit, energy, and determination 
characterize his work. 

"A fertile brain, a calm and purposeful spirit" 

iMITTIE WIGGINS 
Elm City, N. C. 

Mittie Wiggins, our Junior representative from Elm City, is a quiet, unobtrusive, persistent, 
ambitious, loyal, lovable personality. Her smiles and curls will always be welcome to our class 
and to the student body at large. 

"Her eyes are eyes of innocence. 
And her voice is soft and sweet" 



^i 






-Sill 



Thirty -five 



m 



]unior History 



The class of '26 be^^an as all other Freshman classes. Thirt\--nine of the 
most competent came and organized at Atlantic Christian College. The time 
of seeing strange sights and saying strange things (common to all Freshmen) 
was soon over, and we settled down for a while to serious thoughts of study and 
13lans for the futui'e. We soon learned that to Ije college students we must possess 
a certain amount of dignity as well as common sense. 



11 



We were a band of happy friends when we returned in September, 1923, after 
a happy and prosperous vacation. After all the wise counsel our beloved pro- 
fessors gave us, about the importance of "sticking to our task" and getting an 
education, only nineteen returned, but two more knowledge seekers joined our 
ranks. We were eager to begin our work as wise Sophomores. The first thing 
we found real joy in was in treating the "Freshies" as the Sophomores of the 
year before had treated us. We were kind enough to want to be fair, and so we 
treated them just about as roughly as does a cat ])laying with a little mouse. 



t|( 



Most of our class are representati\'es of small towns near Wilson ; There 
are some from Farmville, Washington, Kinston, Griffon, Lucama, Elm City, 
Middlesex, and Wilson. As a result of this nearness, we can go home often, prob- 
al'jlv a bad thing for us intellectually and socially (in one way). 



After another vacation has passed, we are happy to return to our dear old 
A. C. C. and see all our old friends and to begin the usual process of making new 
ones. W^hen we meet a Freshman in the hall and he says, "Are you a Freshman, 
too?" we are proud to say, "No, I am a Junior." Is it not strange that they 
cannot tell us from one of their own ? Our group has both decreased and increasecl. 
The number has decreased from twenty-one to fourteen. One of these boarded 
the ship of Matrimony, and is sailing on. The other, a newcomer, this year has 
left us for other work. We have one "town bo}', " who gave up his profession of 
teaching to join our learned group this year. Our representative from Farmville, 
Al Flanagan, our nightingale, decided he liked the A. C. C. Glee Club better than 
that of Wake Forest. We are glad to have him as our President now. 



HI 



M 



vSo, in our Junior year, we are proud, of our class, at one time diminishing, 
and then increasing, but always keeping the best. 

MiTTiE Wiggins 



Thirty-six 



To the Juniors 

(With apologies to Joseph Addison 



Behold, on campus gay and free 
The Juniors of our A. C. C. 

The fast approaching final year imparts 

An anxious hope to the bravest hearts; 
Hence do their hearts go out to strife. 
And the future hopes control the love of life. 

No evil fears can Junior minds control : 

Heat of progress and noble pride of soul 
O'erlooking the world, the waiting host; 
Though study and labor possessed the middle space, 
That unprovoked they will not fear to pass. 

Nor study nor labor can stop this noble band. 

When for need of these the waiting world doth stand. 



I, i; 



I 



But, O my Muse, what numbers wilt thou find tVIl! 

To sing the golden gains of mind' .sj'' 

Methinks I hear the Juniors' cheering sound. 

The victors' shouts and songs of glee compound. 

The cheering rings of victory peal throughout the hall, ■{_; 

And onward moves the class, each and all. \t 1; 



'Tis now many a Junior's soul has proved |- 

That, in the shock of pressing exams unmoved. 
Amidst confusion, much studying, and despair. 
Examined all the dreadful scenes of now gone year; 

In peaceful thought the year of work sur\-eyed. 

To fainting spirits comes with timely aid 
Inspiring rest, needed by Juniors all. 
And again prepare to work when comes the call. 

vSo when a Junior by great demand, 

With rising tempests shakes the land, 
Such as e'er o'er our America may pass. 
Calm and serene he drives the furious blast. 

And, pleased by noble duties to perform. 

Rides the whirlwind, directs the ship through storm. 

Walter R.\xdolph 



ftM! 



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'3' 



Thirty-seven 



in 



11 
I 




JUNIOR SNAPSHOTS 



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i 



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§ 



Thirty-eight 




^^ 



m 



Sophomore Class Officers 

Anderson Boswell President 

Lucille Baynes Vice President 

Mae Reel Secretary and Treasurer 

Mary Sue King Historian 



Thirty-nine 



Sophomores 



si 







If 



ELOISE BOWERS 

Pembroke, Ga. 

' Of surpassing' beauty and in the 
bloom of youth" 



LUCILLE BAYNES 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

"Her every tone is music's own, 
Like those of morning birds, 

And something more than melody 
Dwells ever in her words. " 



1*^ 



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I? 



ROYALL PHILPOTT 

Reelsboro, N. C. 

'The mind's the standard of the man ' 



JOHN WINFIELD 

Pantego, N. C. 

'The world lavighs with him, but 
never at him 






I& 



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fe 



Forty 



ffri i_ . ■irt. s ,., _ «r ,.^ 



\3j2^ssj3:&si3escr&aC2sa3Ci&ss3£Sic^^ 



Sophomores 




EDXA WOOD 

LaGraxge, N. C. 

'Accuse not nature; she hath "done 
her part. Do thou thine" 



REUBEN BANKS 

Arapahoe, N. C. 

'On their own merits modest men 
are dumb" 



ALBERTA BASS 

LUCAMA, N. C. 

'She is a winsome wee thing, 
She is a bonnv wee thing." 



MARY HARPER 

Wilson, N. C. 

' Tranquility I thou better name than 
ah the family of fame" 




Forty-one 



iff 



Sophomores 



II 



i 




I 



GLADYS WHITLEY 

Paxtego, N. C. 

"She has a natural wise sincerit}", a 
simple truthfulness, and these 
have lent her a dignity as mar- 
velous as the center" 



RUBY CROCKETT 
DrxN, N. C. 

"Persuasive speech and more per- 
suasive sighs, 

Silence that spoke and eloquence of 
e^•es" 



.11 y 



HUGH ROSS 

Wilson, N. C. 

"Whose little body lodged a 
might V mind" 



CALLIE HARRLS 

Pike Road, N. C. 

" Lea\'e silence to the saints; I am 
but human" 



Foriv-two 



The Pine Km 




RAY McILWEAN 

New Berx, N. C. 

'There is no wisdom like frankness" 



LEROY HARRIS 

Greenville, N. C. 

"Far may we search before we find 
A heart so manlv and so kind" 



MARTHA HARRISON 

WiLLIAMSTOM. N. C. 

"And thou art worthy; full of power; 
As gentle, liberal-minded, consistent" 



ELIZABETH BASS 

LUCAMA, N. C. 

' Of manners gentle, of affections mild" 



if 



1^ 

^'1 



Forlv-lhree 



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t *2S 



Sophomores 




MARY SUE KING 

Falkville, Ala. 

"Our business in the field of fight 
Is not to question, but to prove our 
might" 

ANDERSON BOSWELL 

Wilson, N. C. 

"The reason finn, the temperate will. 
Endurance, foresight, strength, and 
skill" 



MAE REEL 

Arapahoe, N. C. 

"I laugh, for hoj^e hath a happy place 

with me; 
If my bark sinks, 'tis to another sea" 

MARY ETHERIDGE 

Kenbridge, Va 

" In nature there's nothing 
melancholy" 



ELSIE WINSTEAD 

Macclesfield, N. C. 

"Zealous, yet modest ; innocent, though 

free ; 
Patient of toil, serene amidst alarms" 



Forly-fou) 



:^SC^S 



Sophomore History 



i 



Here we are. Sophomores in college at last. We did not realize that the glo- 
rious year of 1923 would hold such wonderful honors and surprises. Let us go 
back to see how the start ^^'as made two years ago. 

In September, 1923, there appeared on the campus of A. C. C. representative 
specimens from all o\'er North Carolina and other states. On our arri\'al we 
first matriculated, the face value of which equaled S. Getting settled was like a 
Chinese wedding. Surprises — welcomed or regretted — awaited us at e\'ery turn. 
Our "wives" and homes were selected for us, and we had to bear the consequences. 
Banquets and socials were planned for us. We made a few social blunders, but 
they were covered with smiles because of our importance. Then the old stu- 
dents decided that they would cure us of what they called our "Freshness," be- 
cause we were getting all of the attention. 

On the whole, we had a ver\' successful year. Our Freshman Class was the 
largest in the histon.' of the college. We had our "ups and downs," 'tis true, 
but we accomplished many things of which we are proud. In the literary socie- 
ties and in the other activities of our college we achieved success. We made 
many friendships which will last through life. We had many good times and re- 
ceived new dreams and asjjirations for the future after we had received the cov- 
eted position of Soph in May. 

After a happy, though short \'acation, we found ourseh'es back on the campus 
in September — Sophomores — "upper classmen" at last. Much to our grief and 
sorrow, we found se-\'eral missing from our number. What happy days we spent 
together, renewing "auld acquaintances" and making new friends. T' e Fresh- 
men became our special charge. We made it certain that they should receive 
as good a reception as we had one year before. For several days and especially 
"nights" we did our best to get them placed and to give them a lively time. 

No class of A. C. C. has ever had so bright an outlook as the So]3homore Class 
of this year is now facing. We have hitched our wagon to a star. A. C. C. will 
receive the best we can give. As to the members of this class, nature has been 
generous almost to the degree of extravagance, for it was this class that con- 
tributed two of her noble sons, Boswell and Philpott, for the annual debate. Also 
the most accomplished voice and piano students, as well as several of dramatic 
ability, are found in t^his class. Too, we see signs of the world's next Mary J. 
Holmes in Rose Tilghman. And measured by atiiletic standards, the class is 
not found wanting. 

As a class of Sophomores our days are far spent. We ha\'e had our work and 
our play, still we are not sati.sfied. We know that "a little learning is a dangerous 
thing. " We cry for more knowledge, a higher appreciation of life, and more love. 
Looking backward, we see ourselves standing homesick and afraid at the half 
open door of the Freshman year; looking forward, we see the glorious "vision" 
of "Juniordom" beckoning to us to come on. 

Mary Sue King, Historian 



Forty-Jive 



ne Kno t ^ZS 



'^;^5^^^iS^>3vc^^s?^ivtj;r:;;?5^-t^-^ -tJP;, T;r?P %n-~^ r^r^E^- 



I 
If 




SOPHOMORE SNAPSHOTS 



Forlv-six 



f^ 



3T7ss:rx^s:^ 



The Pine Ksaot *2S 




Freshman Class Officers 

Ray.moxd Bolx'her President 

Louise Stubbs Vice President 

Mary Jones Secretary 

Esther Harrison Treasurer 



ill 



ii 



Forty-seven 



m 



il! 




Vara Lee Thornton 
Bentonville, N. C. 



Belvin Starling 
Hassell, N. C. 



Mary Thornton 
Bentonville, N. C. 



Harvey Brookbanks 
Stokesdale, N. C. 



Minnie Mae Denning 
Bentonville, N. C. 



P 



Forly-eight 



The Pine Knot '25 




fri. 



Walton Thojipson 
Rock Ridire, N. C. 



Eunice Aycock 
Lucama, N. C. 



Henry Stilley 
Comfort, N. C. 



Elsie Peel 
Everctts, N. C. 



George Haislip 
Hasscll, N. C. 



Forlv-nine 



t 



d 



J y 



i-v 



i 




Evelyn Huggins 
Sumter, S. C. 



Dillon Peele (Sophomore) 
Everetts, N. C. 



Sadie Perry 
Williamston, N. C. 



Cecil Reel 
Arapahoe, N. C. 



Esther Ricks 
Pantego, N. C. 



hi 



ill 



Fifty 



The Pine Knot *ZS 



Nona Godwin 
Kenly, N. C. 




Henry Barnes 
Rock Ridge, N. C. 



Kate Brinson 
Arapahoe, N. C. 



Fifly-one 



The 



zs 






I 



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I 



!R 







Hilton Windley 
Pantego, N. C. 



Helen King 
Whitakers, N. C. 



Margaret Silverthorne 
Lake Landing, N. C. 



Henry Fle.mming 
Greenville, N. C. 



vSeliia Wise 
Arapahoe, N. C. 



Fifty-two 



The Pine ¥ 




Cassie Southard 
Stokesdale, N. C. 



Reese Boykin 
Rock Ridge, N. C. 



LiLLiE Lee 
Arapahoe, N. C. 



Clem Banks 
Arapahoe, N. C. 



Caroline Johnston 
Wilson, N. C. 



Fifty-thre 



II 




JlLIA BeLSCHES 

Disputanta, Va. 



Leman Barnhill 
Everetts, N. C. 



Esther Harrison 
Williamston, N. C. 



Alton P. Belangia 
Arapahoe, N. C. 



Margaret Barxes 
Pine To]3s, N. C. 



ii 



M 



Fifty four 




Louise Stubbs 
Wilson, N. C. 



Nellie Fae Barnhill 
Everetts, N. C. 



Leo Weatherly 
Sumter, S. C. 



Bessie Southard 
Stokesdale, N. C. 



Ada Jarvis 
Washington, N. C. 



Fifty-five 



iji 




Violet Goodwin 
Washiiu'ton, N. C. 



Ernest Edmunson 
Hassell, N. C. 



Faye Adams 
Fitzgerald, Ga. 



Fifty-six 






■T 



11 



A Freshmans First Letter Home 

Dere Folks; 

I am writing you to let you know I am still hear. The cushins I brought with 
me shure did help out a whole lot. I am still using one of them. I got here to 
Wilson and the kunductor put me off right at the station. I didn't know where 
the collige wuz, so dreckly a man asked me wuz I goin to school here. I told 
him no sir, but I would like to. He carried me to the collige in a auto, and left 
me there. Before he left he held out his hand and said 50 cents. I thought he 
was pretty stingy to make a feller pay just because he give him a lift. Well, I 
went around and did what they call matrickalatin. I didn't know what I had 
done, but they said that was what it was, so I didn't argey. You know you all 
told me not to show off any. The boy I have to room with is a preacher. I 
tried to sleep on a little, narrow bed, but every time I would go to sleep, the bed 
would turn over and lay on top of me. About 12 o'clock sum boys come around 
and told me to come with them. They carried me out and stood me on a post 
and said "Sing." I did the best I could, but they took me down and used a i-y.i 

whole lot of belts on me. They made me take a cold bath, but I didn't need one ^!!| 

cause I took one the week before I left home. They shure do feed you here. Prunes 
is the national dish of this collige. 

On£ of my teachers told me I was a ■v-erdant student. I haven't looked that fij 

word up yet, but it was something funny, cause everybody laughed. 

Well, Pa, here cums the man what makes us go to bed. Will write again soon. 

Your homesick boy. 



ill 



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:j^ 



Fifty-seven 



The Pine Knot '25 




Fifty-eight 



The Pine Kn&t ^%^ 




Fifty-nine 



Pine 



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An Appreciation 



"Music is the universal language which appeals to the universal 
heart of mankind. Its thrills pervade all nature — in the hum of 
the tiniest insect, in the tops of the wind-smitten pines, in the sol- 
emn diapason cf oceans." 

A'lusic '•epresents the loyful, the beautiful, making its appeal 
through the ear to the heart. 

The emotions of primitive man were expressed in rhythmical 
movements of his feet, or the clapping of his hands. The music of 
the mother's lullaby is one of the first sounds heard by the infant. 
There is no language so meaningful, that in its very emotion finds its 
expression. It has played a very important part in youth, in love, in 
patriotism, in worship, and in every field of action. Pure music is 
no longer written merely for the sake of art, but to express some feel- 
ing. However, it maj' be said that music is the most beautiful and 
ideal of all arts. 

" In music the most indefinite and profound mysteries are re^'ealed 
and placed outside us as a gracious mar^'elous globe; the verj' secret 
of the soul is brought forth and set in the audible world." 



Sixty 



==£i;,u?=iC&== 




Ivy May Smith, B. M. 

Director of the School of Music 
Professor in Piano, Theory. Harmony, 
Counterpoint, Appreciation, and His- 
tory of Music 

Graduate pupil of the Metropolitan 
School of Music; post-graduate pupil of 
the Co-operative School of Music, In- 
dianapolis; degree of Bachelor of Music, 
Indiana University; Master Classes of 
Leo Sampaix, New York; Columbia Uni- 
versity, summer, 1923; present position 
since 191(j. 



Laura Re.msberg 

Professor in Voice, Soefeggio, Ear Training 

Studied in Hood College, Frederick, 
Maryland; graduate of Peabody Con- 
servatory; present position, 1924-25. 




9. 



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=4 



Sixlv-oiie 



fl 



School of Music — Recital 



Chorus: 

Piano: 
Piano: 

Voice: 
Piano: 
Voice: 

Voick: 
Piano: 
Voice: 
Piano: 

Piano: 
Piano: 



December 12, li)L'4 
Progra m 

"Carmena" II. L. Wilson 

"Love Was Once a Little Boy " Nevin 

"Good, Goodnight, Beloved" Pensiite 

Overture " Egmont " Beelhoveii 

Elsie Winstcad, Margaret Barnes 

Waltz in D flat major Clio pin 

Waltz in G flat major 

Mary Jones 

" In the Time of Rcses" Ri-irhnrdl 

Eloise Bowers 

Shadow Dance \ jr n ;; 

TT ■ > MacDoiveU 

Hungarian J 

MacDowell 



"The Robin Sings in the Apple Tree" \ 

"The Sea" j 

Kate Brinson 

"A Dream" Barllcll 

Alfred Flanagan 

Tarantelle 0\ms 15 Mills 

Mary Harper 

' ' Ti >mmy Lad " Ma rzftson 

Moses Moye 
Morning Mood. Opus 46 No. 1 \ ^ ■ 

Anitras Dance. Opul 46 No. 3 J ''"''■^ 

Elsie Winstead 

Invitation to the Dance Carl Maria von W'cher 

Linda Clanton 

"Faust," Opus 20 Gounod 

Linda Clanton and Mary Harper 



Annual Recital — School of Music 

May 25, 1925 
Progra in 

Piano: Overture, " Oberon " Carl Maria von Wehcr 

Elsie Winstead, Margaret Barnes 

Piano: Waltz C Shar|) minor Chopin 

Mary Jones 

Voice: "Angels, Ever Bright and Fair" . . ■ Handel 

Eloise Bowers 

Piano: Waltz G Shar|) minor Levitzki 

Margaret Barnes 

Voice : " Solvejgo Leid " Grieg 

Alfred Fla.nagan 

Piano: Hark! Hark! the Lark Schnherl-Liszt 

Elsie Winstead 

Voice: "Angels' Serenade" Braga 

Helen King 

Piano: Waltz E major, Opus 12 Moszkozvske 

Mary Haroer 

Piano: Senta's Ballade (from " Flying Dutchman ") Wagner-Liszl 

Linda Clanton 

Voice : " M 'appari " Flolow 

Moses Moye 

Piano: Tannhouser March Wagner 

Linda Clanton, Mary Harper 



Sixty-two 



The Pine 




ii'i 



I 



Sixlv-lhree 



The Pine Knot *25 



If I 



Music 

The Ensemble Club is made up of both active members, those 
who are now enrolled in the school of music, and associate members, 
those who have at some time been enrolled in this department. This 
Club was organized at the beginning of last year and has proved to 
be one of the most valuable organizations on the campus. No music 
lover could fail to derive some benefit as well as pleasure from the 
regular meetings, at which time a program consisting of both piano 
and vocal numbers is well rendered. The parties given by this Club 
are always greatly anticipated and enjoj^ed by everyone attending. 

The officers of the Club are: 

Moses Move President 

Mary Harper \'ice President 

Elsie Winstead Secretary 

Alfred Flanagan ' Treasurer 



Sixly-four 



1 




m 
p 

(J 

w 
w 

o 



Sixty-five 



The Pine Knot '29 




The Male ^artette 



Moses Moye 

Second Tenor 
Harvey Underwood 

First Bass 



I )SCAR Merritt 

First Tenor 
Raymond Boucher 

Second Bass 



Voice Department 



May S, 192-5 

I a. "V'ikin? Song" Coleridge-Taylor 

b. "The Big Brown Bear" . . . Mana-Ziicca 
Girls' Glee Club 

II 1. a. "The Spirit's Song" Haydn 

b. "To Me Thou Art a Flower" — 

Rulwnstein 
Alfred Flanagan 



2. Xegro Spirituah 

a. "Peter, Go Ring-a-dem Bells" 

b. "Were You There?" 

c. "I Stood On de Ribber of 

Jordon " 

Moses Moye 



Burleigh 



Schubert 



'Angel of Beauty", . . . 
Kate Brinson 



3. a. " Caro Mio Ben " Giordans 

b. "Absent " Metcalf 

t)scAR Merritt 

III 1. a. "Spring Song" Pinsuti 

b. "Old Mother Hubbard". . . . ,Barneet 
Double Mixed Quartette 

IV. 1. a. " Big Lady Moon ".. Co/crvWgc- ri/y/o/- 

b. "LuUaljy" Brahms 

Mrs. T. D. Meares 



3. a. "On Wings of Song". . .Mendelssohv 

b. "Philosophy " Emmel 

Eloise Bowers 

V. a. "Twilights" Koschat 

b. "The Rose of Sharon" Palmer Alter 

Male Quartette 

VI 1. a. "Marie" Franz 

b. " Villanelle" Del'Acqua 

Lucille Baynes 

2. "Two Grenadiers" Schtiman 

Raymond Boucher 

VII " Rolling Down to Rio" German 

VIII "Alma Mater" 

Glee Club 



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Sixty-six 



The Pine Knot 'IS 



College \^esper Services 

Processional: ''Hark, the Herald Angels Sing" Mendelssohn 

Invocation Mr. Hilley 

Anthem: "0 Come, All Ye Faithful" Reading 

Scripture Reading Rnhy Crockett 

Christmas Carols: 

"God Rest Ye, Merry Gentlemen" | 

"The First Noel " \ Traditional 

"We Three Kings of Orient Are" J 

Solo : "Holy Night " Adam 

Lucille Baynes 

Hymn: " It Came Upon the Midnight Clear" Willis 

Address Mr. Barclay 

Quartet : "Silent Night " Griiber 

Hymn (Recessional) : "Joy to the World" Handel 

Benediction: Dresden Amen 



Sixty-seven 




SI 



Ojficers of the Dramatic Club 

J. Park Nunn President 

Ruby Crockett Secretary 

Hilton Windley Treasurer 

CLUB MEMBER.S 

Reba Stubbs Sadie Greene 

Charlie Grey Raulen Parron Gallop 

Ruby Crockett Mary Jane Briley 

Ruth Skinner Annie Harper 

Lyma Patrick Hilton Windley 

Helen Kint,' Louise Stubbs 

J. Park Nunn Mary Sue Kin^; 

Gladys Whitley Hattie Peek 
Alary Etheridge 



I 

9 



Sixty-eight 



Th* 




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Sixty-nine 



' i n e K 



The Dramatic Club 

The Dramatic Club of Atlantic Christian College is composed 
of eighteen members, all students of the School of Expression. It 
is headed this year by a very capable set of officers, with J. Park Nunn 
as President. Ruby Crockett as Secretary, and Hilton Windley as 
Treasurer. 

It is a very successful organization, and one of the most prac- 
tical and democratic clubs on the campus. It has contributed 
much to the school and especially to the societies in the way of 
entertainment. 



i 



Two programs of special interest have been given this year. 
"Daddy Long Legs." the commencement play, was repeated in 
vSeptember, playing to a large audience. The second was given 
for the benefit of the Boys' Lobby Fund, and was composed of 
several readings and a one-act comedy, "Thursday Evening." 



II 



The Club has a few engagements scheduled at neighboring towns 
for the next month. These will finish the Club's work for the year, 
as no commencement play will be given. 



Seventy 



The Pine Knot 'ZS 




''Daddy Long-Legs''' 

A Four-Act Comedy 
Presented by the Dramatic Club 

Characters 

Jerv'is Pendleton, an aristocratic bachelor Frederick Ferrell Grim 

Miss Pritchard, his friend Reba Stubbs 

Mrs. Pendleton, his sister-in-lau\ a snob Louise Stubbs 

Mrs. Semple, his old nurse Reba Stubbs 

Judy, an orphan Charlie Grey Raulen 

Julia, Mrs. Pendleton's daughter Rub}' Crockett 

Sallie McBride, a young college girl Sadie Greene 

Jimmy McBride, a student at Yale J. Park Nunn 

Griggs, Mr. Pendleton's Secretary Parron Gallop 

Walters, the Pendleton butler Mr. Case 

Carrie, Mrs. Semple' s maid Gladys Whitley 

Mrs. Lippett, matron at the John Greer Home Sadie Greene 

Cyrus Wykof!", Abner Parsons, trustees of the Home Perry Case, Parron Gallop 

Sadie Nannie Pearl Quinerly 

Gladiola Eloise Case 

Loretta Mary Morton 

Mamie Roberta Hayes 

Bill Bill Adams 

Freddy Perkins WilHam Stubbs 

Sallie Helen Hodges Hackney 

Grace Mary Elizabeth Hilley 

Minnie Kate Lamb 

Tommy Howard Hilley, Jr. 

Act I — The dining room of the John Greer Home. 

Act H — Judy's study at college a year later. 

Act hi — The sitting room at Lock Willow Farm, summer, three years later. 

Act IV — Jervis Pendleton's librar\' two months later. 



Seventy-one 



I 



I 



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r^- 




Sevenl v-lwo 



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1 Knot '2$ 



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r4 



In IsAemoriam 

To Mrs. Ethel McDair.mid Grim 
Died February 22, 1925 

Grow old along with me! 
The best is yet to be. 

The last of life, for which the first was 
made. 
Our times are in His hand, 
Who saith, "A whole I planned, 

"Youth shows but half; trust God. 
see all. nor be afraid!" 

Browning 



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Seventy-three 



Hattie Peek 

Graduate of King's Business College 

Graduate of Emanuel Business 

Collefje 

Taught — Fremont High School, 
King's Business College. Present 
position, 1924 and 1925. 




The Commercial Department 



The Commercial Department, under the efficient teaching of Miss Hattie 
Peek, has come to be one of the most important special departments of the col- 
lege. The latest methods and devices are being used successfully. This class 
is made up mostly of town students, although there are many boarding students 
taking this work. 

An even larger department is expected for next year. 



Seveiilv-four 



The Pine Knot 



•^^' 




f-5 



\3 ■ 

If 



Commercial Cluh 

Flower: Siceet Pea Colors: Green and White 

Motto : ' ' Excelsior ' ' 

Sallie Laalm President 

Oscar Merritt 1 'ice President 

AiTHA AIcKixxEV Secretary and Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Thclma Bartlett Louise Hij,'h 

Elsie Boyett Duncan Murray 

Guy Boswell Hattic Peek 

Norman Barnes Waddell Pate 

Mary Jane Briley Ruth Raynor 

Lucas Barnes Edith Ross 

Jimmie Clark • Hu^^jh Ross 
Ruby Couch Harvey Underwood 

Callie Corbitt Charlie Walker 

J. C. Davis Anna Ware 

Louise Mann 



a 



Seventy-five 



Tl&e Pine K; 



XS 





Scvcnlv-six 



^ ■ -■- 





^;5:e:S5?^SC22^SC2£sSSC!:eSjCE:- 



:Essa5»S5?&«t'' 



Our Debt to tfie Churches 



Atlantic Christian College owes most of its possessions to the churches of Christ in North 
and South Carolina. But there are other states which have made a recognized contribution, 
as have members of other denominations throughout the Eastern section. 

In the 3'ear 1900 several faithful Disciples in North Carolina had the vision of a great college 
for the purpose of training young men and women for Christian service. These men, by sacri- 
fice, toil, and hard work, brought their ideals to realities by presenting to the Disciples in North 
Carolina the great cause, which was so readily accepted. They met the need like real men by 
responding with their hard-earned money to be used in starting a college. From October 30 
to November 2, 1901, the 57th North Carolina Missionary Convention met at Kinston, N. C, 
at which time a committee reported the purchasing of the Kinsey Seminar\^ in Wilson, N. C, 
from the Wilson Education Association. The institution was named Atlantic Christian College 
and incorporated May 1, 1902. From that time the college has grown, until we now have an 
A-grade institution. We owe all this to the churches, and without the fine support given by them 
in money and service, there could never have existed such a school as this one, of which we are 
so proud today. 

Not only are the churches responsible for the origin and life of the college; they are responsible 
for a majority of the student body. The churches do not send their boys and girls to Atlantic 
Christian College because the school is made possible by them and because they would support 
it with numbers of students; they send their boys and girls here because the college offers work 
that is superior, for the purpose of training Christian men and women for the duties of tomorrow. 
The college seeks to train them in unity with all people, and as broad-minded, well-balanced 
men and women. 

The college is indebted to the churches who have been so loyal in making possible the main- 
tenance that has permitted such a great work to be done here. For the past five years Disciples 
in the Carolinas have averaged giving .?7,094.79 a year, purely for maintaining Atlantic Christian 
College. They have also established an endowment fund. This shows that the college has a 
backing financially with Christians, which has made it possible for us to exist and grow. 

It owes to them its educational ideals. These ideals wiU lead humanity on into higher and 
more abundant life. These are made realistic here under the efficient, Christian leadership of 
President H. S. Hilley. Many of the greatest Christian leaders help in this by coming to the 
Chapel and addressing the student body on some of the most vital questions, which make possi- 
ble the development of these ideals into Christian character. 

The college owes to the churches its largest opportunity to serve. The field is large and the 
laborers are few. The college can render a greater sen.'ice to the needs of the world if the churches 
will use this matchless opportunity. All we are and all we hope to be we owe to them. They 
alone can make possible a larger life for the college, which will glorify God and serve mankind 
in this world, and in the world to come give eternal life to many, by continuing this greatly need- 
ed help. 

Paul C. Southard 



^i 



F .< 






fi 



Seventy-seven 



w 



IS 



IB 



T. W. C. A. 

There are many organizations in school whose jjurpose it is to foster the prin- 
ciples and teachings of Jesus about the eternal things of life. Ho\ve\-er, the re- 
ligious organization which demands and obtains the loyalty of every girl's heart 
is our Y. W. C. A. Each Sunday evening all the girls assemble for worship. These 
vesper services are a source of inspiration and inculcation of noble ideals in the 
girls' lives. The Y. W. C. A. also provides social affairs and occasional hikes, 
though this phase has not been greatly emphasized recently. Each alumnus 
cairies with her pleasant memories of our Alma Mater — in her heart of hearts 
the tenderest regard for her own organization — the Young Women's Christian 
Association. 



T. W. C. A. Cabinet 

Ruth J. Skixner President 

LiLL WiNSTEAD ]'icc Prcs!de)tt . Chainnan of Program Coniiiiiltee 

Callie Harris Seerctary 

Mae Reel Treasurer 

Nannie Pearl Ouinerly Chairman of Program Committee 

Mary vSue King Chairman of Finanee C 'ommittee 

Janie Manning CJiairman of Social Committee 

Mary Jones Chairman of Social Service Committee 

Gladys Whitley , . . .Chairman of World Felloicship Committee 

Lyma Patrick Chairman of Publicity Committee 

Ruby Crockett Under Graduate Representative 



Seventy-eight 




'Ml 



!|i 



1 



I 



THE V. W. C. A. CABIXET OFFICERS 



Sei'eiilv-niiie 



TPv ra e 



The Religious Activities of the College 



Atlantic Christian College is very active in religious activities, since its stu- 
dent loody is made up largely of students who come from Christian homes, and 
the college is suj^ported by the churches and led by Christian leaders. 

Every morning at ten o'clock the students and faculty assemble in the audi- 
torium for worship. The sennces are conducted by members of the faculty 
and \'isiting ministers. Brief addresses and lectures are given on religion, morals, 
good manners, the choosing of professions and vocations in life. 

Pupils are required to attend church and Bible school at the church of their 
choice every Lord's day. They are very enthusiastic and take a very active 
part in man)' wa}'S. 









One of the greatest religious activities of the college is the organization com- (( 

posed of ministers and religious workers, which is known as the Fellowship Club. f; 

This club meets every week and discusses practical problems in religion, which jji 

will aid them in rendering more efficient ser\'ice in their chosen fields. vSome of « 

the most prominent ministers address this club and give the students splendid |: 

advice about beginning their great work. i: '■ 

Another organization which parallels the Fellowship Club is the Young Worn- Ci', ii 

en's Christian Assoc ation. This is composed of girls for the purpose of creating ,! : 

a better Christian spirit and developing Christian leaders. I'. 

Every Wednesday evening the boys meet in the lobby and engage in a prayer JJ i 

meeting. This gives them an opportunity to speak in public and learn to pray. '■ | 

The religious interest and welfare of the students are fostered by a standing ■ : ;• 

Committee on Religious Education. This committee enriches the Christian ■; ; 
spirit of the college by projects and by securing religious lecturers. The students u ij 

spiritual life is trained here at the college, in order that each may live an efficient C; ' 
life in a great age. j! ii' 



k 






Eighty 



T!?e P?s?e Kwo-V^'^ 



K?^ 







it; 



The FeHowship Cluh 



First Semester 

James Lawson Acting President 

Charles James Secretary and Treasurer 

Second Semester 

Louis Mayo President 

Al Heath Mayfield 1 'ice President 

Henry P. Flemming Secretary and Treasurer 



Eighty-one 




s 






The Religious Education Committee 

Profkssor Perry Case — CJiairman 
President H. S. Hilley Professor F. F. Grim 

Professor W. T. Alattox ' Mr. John Barcla\- 
Miss Fannie Harper 

J. Park Nuxk Representative of Student Body 

RoYALL Philpott Representative of Fellowship Club 

Reuben Banks Representative of Boys' Prayer Meeting 

Nannie Pearl Quinerly Representative of Y. IT. C. A. 

Ruth Skinner Representative of Student Volunteers 

Mary Jones Representative of Student Body 



Ei'zfitv-ttco 



'^he Pine Knot '2S 




THE BOYS' PRAYER MEETI.XG 



«J 



Eighty-three 



n 



Alethian Literary Society 



First Sejiester 

Charlie Grey Raulen President 

Mary Jones Vice President 

Agnes Cobb Secretary 

Janie Manning Treasurer 

Alfred Flanagan Critic 

Mary Jones Pianist 

Moses Moye Chaplain 

Park Nunn Chairman Program Committee 

Second Semester 

Everett J. Harris President 

John Winfield 1 'ice President 

Ruby Crockett Secretary 

Edna Wood Treasurer 

Dolly Lewis Critic 

Mary Harper Pianist 

John Ross Chaplain 

Janie Manning Chairman Program Committee 



iJ 






'! T' 



Belva Adkins 
Eunice Aycock 
Alberta Bass 
Nellie Fay Barnhill 
Leman Barnhill 
Esther Bryant 
Han,'cy Brookbanks 
Lucille Baynes 
Elizabeth Bass 
Agnes Cobb 
Ruby Crockett 
Esther Dew 
Ernest Edmunson 
Alfred Flanagan 
Parron Gallop 
Vivian Holden 
Annie Harper 



ROLL 1924-25 

Mary Harper 
Everett J. Harris 
Leroy Harris 
George Haislip 
Mary Jones 
Caroline Johnston 
Dolly Lewis 
Louise Mann 
Janie Manning 
'Milton Moye 
Moses Moye 
Robert Moye 
Duncan Murray 
Park Nunn 
Lyma Patrick 
Elsie Peel 



Dillon Peel 
Royall Philpott 
Charlie Grey Raulen 
Ruth Raynor 
Esther Ricks 
John Ross 
Paul Southard 
Belvin Starling 
Henry Stilley 
Clyde Tilghman 
Rose Tilghman 
Margaret Silverthome 
Louise Tomlinson 
Leo Weatherly 
Edna Wood 
John Winfield 
Mary Jane Briley 






Eighty-four 



The Pine Knot '2C 




^^ 



I'HE ALETHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Eighty-five 



I y 



•I 



! 








V/CE- PRE5ID&/^r- 




i£CR£TA/Zy 










OFFICERS OF THE ALETHIAN SOCIETY 



Eighty-six 



The Pine Knot ^2S 
















vice - Pf^B S /O/S/^T- 





rK£A5Ufi£/Z. 



SECKBTArZY 




CKIT/C 



OFFICERS OF THE HESPERIAN SOCIETY 



Eiehlv-sve}! 



it '%S 




Hesperian Literary Society 

First Semester 

Louis Mayo President 

Nannie Pearl Ouinerly Vice President 

Mae Stancill Secretary 

Mary Sue King Treasurer 

Charles James Chaplain 

Ruth Skinner Critic 

Linda Clanton Pianist 

Second Semester 

Louise Harrison President 

Gladys Whitley Vice President 

Hilton Windley Secretary 

Callie Harriss Treasurer 

Henry Flemming Chaplain 

Nannie Pearl Ouinerly Critic 



^ 




ROLL 1924-25 






Faye Adams 


Esther Harrison 


Ray Mcllwean 




Rueben Banks 


Louise Harrison 


Oscar Merritt 




Elsie Boyette 


Callie Harris 


Nannie Pearl Ouinerly 


1 


P. C. Brooks 


Evelvn Huggins 


Mae Reel 


John L. Bickers 


Charles James 


Walter Randolph 




Kate Brinson 


Ada Jarvis 


Hugh H, Ross 




Anderson Boswell 


Marv Sue King 


Cecil Reel 




Alton Balangia 


Helen King 


Edith Ross 




Clem Banks 


James Lawson 


Ruth Skinner 




Eloise Bowers 


Lillie Lee 


Louise Stubbs 




Raymond Boucher 


Sallie Lamm 


Dewitte Speir 




Margaret Barnes 


Beatrice Teacher 


G. H. Sullivan 




Linda Clanton 


Sue Elma Tavlor 


Mac Stancill 




Minnie Mae Denning 


Vara Lee Thornton 


Hilton "Windley 




Martha Congleton 


Har\^ev Underwood 


Gladvs Whitley 




Marv Etheridge 


Lill Winstead 


Mittie Wiggins 




Henry Flemming 


Elsie Winstead 


Charlie Moore Walker 




Norwood Grady 


Jimmie Clark 


Selma Wise 




Nona Godwin 


Louis Mayo 


Al Heath Mavfield 




Violet Goodwin 




AI. O. Williams 



Eighly-eiglit 




The v<M<^ iCt«(rt>t ^^e 



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Eighty-vine 




■ InterSociety Debaters of 1925 

Query: "Resolved — Tliat the Philippine Islands should be given immediate 

independence" 






V-, 



Alethian — Negative 
Rose Tilghman 
Ro3-all Philpott 
(Parron Gallop — Alternate used) 



Hesperian — Affirmative 
Anderson Boswell 
Ruth y. Skinner 



Ninety 



i 



^1 




ii! 



1(1 



Xiiielv-niie 



F 



Athletics for 1924 and 1925 



Football of 1924 was a season of ups and downs. With only a small squad 
to select from, A. C. C. was unable to put in the field a team to compete with the 
bigger teams of the state. The boys played creditably, and were well led by 
Captain Banks. 

On the squad were Banks. Reel, Winfield, Barnhill, Tilghman, Conekin, Bouch- 
er, Privette, A'lurray, Brookbank, Ross, Boswell, Underwood, Gallop, Flanagan, 
Tomlinson, Mcllwean, Lawson, and Barnes. 

The team was managed successfully by Moses Moye, who scheduled several 
important games and showed his ability to care for his men. 

The outlook is bright for 1925, as practically all of the team will be back in 
college. 

Basket ball of the 1925 season has been A'ery successful. The team, inanaged 
by Everett Harris, has plaj^ed several important games, winning three of them. 
With efficient coaching, the boys are constantly improving. As all of the team 
will be back in '25 and '26, we may be assured of a successful season. 

The baseball outlook for A. C. C. is very promising. Under the tutelage 
of Coach Barclay, the team is developing into a strong one, and good results can 
be expected this year. 

On the team are Reel, Belangia, Barnhill (Captain), Winfield, Barnes, Clarke, 
Tilghman, Mercer, Boswell, Brookbank, Mcllwean, and Lawson. 



.,jj;=Zitjj^ 



11 
^1 



Ninety-two 








i 



Athletic Association Officers 

Ruth J. Skixxer President 

J. Park Nuxn Vice President 

Louise Harrison Secretary 

Moses Move Manager of Football 

Everett J. Harris Manager of Basket Ball and Baseball 



Nineiv-three 



fr 



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H 



Ninely-foiir 



jiescz^ai;^- 



A. 


C. 


vs. 


A. 


C. 


vs. 


A. 


C. 


vs. 


A, 


C. 


vs. 


A. 


C. 


vs. 


A. 


C. 


vs. 


A. 


C. 


vs. 


A. 


C. 


vs. 


A. 


C. 


vs. 


A. 


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vs. 


A. 


C. 


\-s. 


A, 


C. 


vs. 


A. 


C. 


vs. 


A. 


c. 


vs. 



Bas\et Ball 

Rocky Alount at Wilson 

Nashville at Wilson 

Greensboro at Greensboro 

Elon at Elon 

Nashville at Nash\-ille 

Williamston at Wilson 

A}-den at Wilson 

Fort Bragg at Wilson 

Selma at Selma 

Williamston .... at Williamston 

Ayden at Ayden 

Selma at Wilson 

Farmville at Farm\'ille 

Farmville at Wilson 




BOUCfi£a 




T/LGHMAN 



I 



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Xirely five 



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Our Players 



Captain Underwood — Center 
Boucher — Fonvard 

Ross — Fora'ard 

TiLGHMAN — Guard 

McIlwean — Guard 

Reserves: Mayfield, Lawson, and 

Merritt 



t:. ■ 



AiERfZlTT 



Niiielv-six 



^^iSsssCffiss:: 



■ I 



The 



.-^sssc^&^^r&sr 



T 



ennis 



With two new courts giving ample space for all players, tennis is becoming 
the popular game of the spring season. Another tournament will probably be 
staged this commencement, as was done last year. There will be se\'eral new 
competitors for the championship, both in the doubles and in the singles. John 
Ross won in the singles last year, and will be a formidable foe to all candidates 
this year. 

Much fun and recreation are being enjoyed by all the students. 



Gym Training for Girls 



The Physical Culture Class which meets twice each week, has proved to be 
the greatest factor in the athletic life of the college girls for the school year of 
'24-'25. The lack of athletic teams among the girls has left practically all the 
physical development to this class. It is composed of the boarding girls and 
several day students. 

Miss Varina Woodard has made a very capable instructor, her interest in 
the girls winning for her their respect and co-operation. She has made herself 
one of us, taking part in the games and stunts we have enjoyed. 

Most of the work of the class has been within doors, but now that we have 
warm and favorable weather, outdoor work may be carried on successfully. The 
class is looking forward to hikes and other amusements 



Ninetv-seven 




;i 



Nintty-eight 



■u. 



'^ Pin 



IT .« « •*• ' •* « 



CLUBS 




III 



Ninety-nine 



Phi Sigma Tau 

Colors ; Black and Gold Flower : Black-eyed Susan 

Motto: "Cor Unum, Via Una" 



SORORES IN URBE 



1912 
Mrs. H. P. Moseley 
Mrs. Paul E. Jones 
Mrs. Worthington 
Henrietta Moye 

1913 

Mrs. Arthur White 
Mrs. George TomHnson 

1914 
Mrs. E. S. Peek 
Mrs. Foxhall 
Ruth Hardy 
Annie Laurie Lang 

1915 

Mrs. Lucy Jones 
Charlotte Hodges 
Mrs. Samuel Lawrence 
Mrs. A. B. Windham 

1916 

Mrs. K. A. Stewart 
Mrs. Frank Sexton 
Mrs. Sultan Flowers 
Mrs. J. G. Luttrell 
Mrs. Byrd 
Mrs. Luther TomHnson 

1917 

Mrs. Kate Price 
Grace Rice 
Lura Clay 
Mrs. Knott Proctor 



1918 
Hattie Moseley 
Helene Hudnell 
Lottie Wilson 

1919 

Mrs. Irvin Winstead 
Leola Saunders 
Mrs. Allen Moore 
Christine Whitley 

1920 

Sallie Adams 
Anna Moore 

1921 

Gladys Peele 

1922 
Rosa Pridgen 
Reba Stubbs 
Margaret Eagles 
Lossie TomHnson 
Beth Buerbaum 
Louise Harrison 

1923 

Elizabeth Etheridge 

Nelle Moj^e 

Charlotte Ruth Sumerell 

1924 
Mary Etheridge 
Martha Harrison 
Eloise Bowers 
Ruby Crockett 

1925 
Esther Harrison 
Caroline Johnston 
Ada Jarvis 



I 



One Hundred 



The Pi«e Knot '2§ 






■I' 

! 



One Hundred One 



Sigma Tail Chi 



Founded October 4. 1920 
Colors; White and (iold Flo\vp;r: W'liite and )'elloic L'hrysanthciuiims 

Motto: "Sitiiins I'niini" 



1920 



Kate Bowex 
Rachel Bishop 
Ruby Evans 



An'xie Ri'th Joxes 

A.MAN'DA Ross 

Mae Stanx'ill 



Marjorie Grantham 



1921 



Alice Galloway Lula Norris Cox 

Evelyn Phillips 



m 



1922 



Mary Alice Smith 



Effie Pridgen 



11 



1923 



\'iola Freeman 
Mary Jones 



Edna Wood 
AIae Reel 



f 



1924 

Nellie Fae Barnhill Elsie Peel 

Anna Ware 



If 



One Hundred Two 








I 





M 



One Hundred Three 



The Pine Knot *ZS 



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iii 



Owe Hundred Four 



The Pin 




The A'l Club 

Mae Stancill President 

Mae Reel 1 'ice President 

Edna Wood Secretary and Treasurer 

CLUB MEMBERS 

Mae Stancill Edna Wood 

Mary vSue King Mae Reel 

Elsie Peel Nellie Fae Barnhill 



I 



One Hundred Five 



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One Hundred Six 




The Pine Knot 



The Education Cluh 



First Se.mester 

E.N. GR.A.DY President 

Louise Harrisox 1 'ice President 

M.\RY Sue King Secretary 

Gl.advs Whitley Treasurer 

Second Se.mester 

Leroy H.\rris President 

AIacox Moore 1 'ice President 

Lucille Bayxes Secretary 

Hexry FLE.^LMIXG Treasurer 

ROLL 



M 



1,' 



Esther Harrison 


Marv Etheridge 


E. J. Harris 


9 


Louise Harrison 


Edna Wood 


Lero\' Harris 


li 


Mae Stancill 


Louise Tomlinson 


P. C. Brooks 




Mae Reel 


Macon Moore 


Dolly Lewis 


%i 


Vivian Holden 


Lucille Bavnes 


E. N. Grady 




Gladys Whitley 


Nannie Pearl Quinerh' 


Parron Gallop 


/' '' 


Callie Harris 


Alberta Bass 


Charles James 


f-l ! 


Annie Harper 


Elizabeth Bass 


F. F. Grim 


lil 


Janie Manning 


Mittie Wiggins 


G. H. SuUivan 


'y ' 


Mary Harper 


Mary Sue King 


Alfred Flanagan 


il' 


Ruth Skinner 


Ada Jarvis 


Henr\' Flemming 




Lill Winstead 


Selma Wise 
Rubv Crockett 


Eloise Bowers 





One Hundred Seven 



29 




The V/ilson County Cluh 

Anderson Boswell President 

Louise Stubbs Secrctarv and Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



Sue Elma Taylor 
Anderson Boswell 
Norwood Grady 
Lill Winstead 
Rose Tilghman 
Sallie Lamm 
Charlie Grey Raulen 
Walton Thompson 
Louise Stubbs 



Esther Bryant 
Elizabeth Bass 
Alberta Bass 
Eunice Aycock 
Mittie Wiggins 
Belva Adkins 
Agnes Cobb 
Beatrice Teacher 
Julia Belsches 



M 



One Hundred Eight 




The "Furriners" Cluh 

Al Heath Mayfield President 

Linda Clanton \ 'ice President 

Eloise Bowers Secretary and Treasurer 

Roll Home State 

Mar\' Sue King Alabama 

Ra\Tnond Boucher A labama 

John L. Bickers Georgia 

Eloise Bowers Georgia 

Mrs. A. R. Moore Georgia 

Faye Adams Georgia 

Laura J. Beach Connecticut 

Linda Clanton Georgia 

Leo Weatherley vSouth Carolina 

Laura Remsberg Maryland 

Evelyn Huggins South Carolina 

W. S. Hinegardncr Virginia 

Mrs. W. S. Hinegardner \^irginia 

Mary Etheridge Virginia 

Al Heath .Mavfield Texas 



One Hundred Nine 



!i 




i 



The Pitt County Club 

Moses Move President 

Mary Jones 1 ice President 

Dewitte Spear Secretary and Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Ruth J. Skinner . Alfred Flanagan 

Henry Alercer ■ Moses Move 

Leroy Harris Henr\- Flemming 

Nannie Pearl Ouinerly Robert Move 

Dewitt Spear Mary Jones 






One Hundred Ten 



The Pine Knot 



e^ 




"f?--. "^'- ■■■'-." j4_ —^i *^i»'5! 

. - - - ■^' - -^ ■ l 

The Scieyice Cluh 

Henry Fle.mjiing President 

LiLLiE Lee Secretary and Treasurer 

Prof. W. S. Hixegardner Advisor 

CLUB MEMBERS 

Bessie Southard Ernest Edmunson Margaret Silverthorne 

Lillie Lee Clyde Tilghman Cassie Southard 

Henry Flemming ' Elsie Peel Raymond Boucher 

Louise Tomlinson Minnie Mae Denning Hugh Ross 

Han-ey Brookbanks Henry Mercer Esther Ricks 

P. C. Brooks Julia Belsches Reuben Banks 

Walton Thompson Alton Belangia Evelyn Huggins 

George Haislip Vara Lee Thornton Walter Randolph 

John L. Bickers Cecil Reel Al Heath Max-field 



4 



n 



M 



'A 



|li 



0)11' Hundred Eleven 



'■ ^ -:■■ ^ ¥5r~«« Trr«««,«- '^k 



Pine Knot Sta^ 




Charlie Grev Raulen 



J. Park Nunn 



Charlie Grey Raulen Editor-in-Chief 

J. Park Nunn Business Manager 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Ruth J. Skinner Assistant Editor 

Reba M. Stubbs -issistant Business Manager 

Nannie Pearl Quinerly Literary Editor 

Al Heath Mayfield Assistant Literary Editor 

Lill Winstead Art Editor 

Walter Randolph Assistant Art Editor 

John Ross • Athletic Editor 

Janie AIanning Music Editor 

Moses Moye Music Editor 

Parron G. Gallop Dramatic Editor 

Paul Southard Religious Editor 

Louise Tomlinson Wit Editor 



f 



One Hundred Twelve 



:^ac»:«5ss«iSi:&a35Ee«3P:^"' 




III 



w. 



One Hundred Thirteen 



^ 



li 







0??f' Hundred Fourlceu 



Event Calendar 



September 
12 — Church reception. 
25 — Joint Society reception. 

October 
10 — Dramatic Club presents "Daddy Long Legs." 
31 — Hallowe'en party. 

November 
8 — Alusic Club party. 

11 — Dramatic Club presents "Thursday Evening." 
13 — Edgar C. Raine lectures on Alaska. 
24 — Wilson County Fair da}-. 
27 — The Facult>-'s "Queer Party." 

December 
12 — Music Recital. 

14 — Christmas \'esper Sen-ices by Glee Club. 
17 — Dramatic Club's Christmas dinner. 

January 
12 — Otis Skinner in " Sancho Panzo" at the Wilson. 
21-24 — Mid-term examinations. 
29— Snow!: 

February 
14 — Dramatic Club part\-. 

19 — A. C. wins in basket ball from Fort Bragg. 
21 — Ensemble Club party. 



J 



March 
10 — Rev-. Peter Ainslie conducts a series of meetings. 
17 — Annual Inter-Society Debate. 
25 — "Ten Commandments" at the Wilson. 



April 
3 — Religious Education Book Social. 
4 — Ensemble Club party. 
9 — Easter holidays begin. 
23 — Mrs. Marion Leland, reader, gives recital. 

May 
4 — Senior picnic. 

8 — Recital of the Voice Department. 
23-26 — Commencement week. 



One Hundred Fifteen 



i* 



i 

"Hahehunt Lumen Vitoe" 

Basic in the field of human endeavor is the universal quest for life. Through- 

'4 out the ages, like a will-o'-the-wisp, it has lured men to venture bold and daring 

; J feats, as well as to conquer apparentlv insurmountable difficulties. Tradition 

'' " leaves a rich heritage both in ballad and song, relating the experiences of ancient 

■ -, knights who spent the very essence of their existence in search of the "Holy Grail, " 

;y which men deemed to possess magical life-giving qualities. Again, new worlds 

' ^ have been discovered by men who were searching for a renewal of youth. On 

such an adventure. Ponce de Leon, the Spanish knight errant, chanced upon 

the shores of our own sunnv state of Florida. 






The only visible rewards were declining strength and approaching old age. 
The futility of finding a panacea for physical death has then been adequately 
demonstrated in the experience of the race. Yet, there is a death which is more 
disastrous in its consequences than the cessation of earthly existence. 

The panacea for this latter death is here given in the college motto, "They 
shall have the light of life. " Light is necessary to all life. Just as plants perish 
without contacts with the heavenly sun, so human lives shrivel and atrophy with- 
out the streams of energy which may be obtained from communication with 
worlds beyond their own mental horizon. 

This institution, as well as others of its kind, seeks to give light and life to 
:tj" its students through the presentation of truth. Truth is eternal. Any institu- 

tion whose dominant aim is to establish truth is, therefore, striving to build for 
eternity, for knowledge is the cornerstone of life. 

While knowledge does insure light, one must avoid superficial knowledge, 
that his light may not be pen'erted. "To know the Father is life eternal. " Alor- 



' 



One Hundred Sixteen 



The Pine Knot '2$ 



tals learn to know God through His handiwork, but often these ghmpses are fal- 
lible, and must be refined. Through some influence, knowledge and skills must be 
translated into ideals and attitudes which will result in character. The prism, 
par excellence, for breaking these light rays is religiotis education. Its purpose 
is to interpret all the phenomena of God's universe in such a way as to make His 
revelation more complete and influential in the lives of men. 

This, in a word, is the contribution which our college desires to make to civi- 
lization. It is an effort to ser\-e the rising generations by presenting the truth 
in its proper perspective and showing how it ma}- be profitably utilized in the 
realization of God's Kingdom on earth. The inevitable by-product of this pro- 
cedure is divine satisfaction in life itself. 

RrxH Skinner 



I 



Oiw Hundred Sevenlcen 



Who's Who at A. C. C. in 1925 



I 

3. 






! 



Ill 






'J I 






>1 (T/oi-p Observer of All Rules Helen King 

A Loyal Aliiiiiniis of A. C. C " Pert " Phillips 

Biggest Sport Mae StanciU 

Biggest Talker Mary Etheridjje 

Biggest Baby Martha Congleton 

Best All-' round Nannie Pearl Ouinerly 

Best Fisherman Mae Reel 

So)iie (f) of Her Fish — Parron Gallop, Clem Banks, John Winfield, Ra\- Mcllwean, 
Alton Belangia, Alfred Flanagan, Harvey Underwood, Robert Moye, 

Oscar Meiritt 

Best Natiired Esther Ricks 

College Flirts Eloise Bowers, Louise Stubbs, Mar}- Etheridge, Faye Adams 

"Canned" Dates Faye Adams and Parron Gallop 

College Fool Robert Moye 

Candidates for f^egree of i\ . A. {Know All) E. N. Grad_\-, Mae Reel 

Dignity Personified Leroy Harris 

Enthusiastic Horticiilliirists Miss Fannie and Mr. ^^'arren 

Golden Locks Mar\- Rue King 

/ Am IT , Al Ma>-field 

"/ a)n yearning for someone to love me. anyone" Everett Han-is, Ruth Skinner 

J oiliest Miss Remsberg 

Most "Love-Sick Lad" Clyde Tilghman 

Most Popular Ra\-mond Boucher 

" The Elite Model" Rub\- Crockett 

The Lani-cst Boy Henry Flemming 

The Xight Onf " Doc" Ganlner 



r»! 



One Hundred Eighteen 



The Pine 



fj' 



k 



■Hill 



Our Daily Menu |;j 

Salt and Pepper Ruth and Ra^nnond 

Bread and Butter Charlie Grey and Park 

Ham and Eggs Mary and Dewitte 

Crackers and Cheese Lill and Joe 

Ice Cream and Cake Edna and Leman 

Peaches and Cream Ruby and Ch'de 

Pork and Beans Agnes and John ,i^ ] 

Pancakes and Syrup Sallie and Henry 

Milk and Pie Ada and Harvey 

Grits and Gravy Sue and Hilton 

Beej and Potatoes Vara Lee and "Red" 



li 



9 



One Hundred Nineteen 



t 








'I 



ll 



Senior Abilities and Aspirations 



Name 



Abilitv 



Aspiration 



Agnes Cobb Keeping Agnes and John 

apart To be next dietitian at A. C. C. 

Parron Gallop ......... Writing love letters To be a poet 

Vivian Holden Stringing 'em To string a "Jap" 

Everett Harris Hunting pretty girls To get married 

Dolly Lewis Being sweet To keep the name of Lewis 

Al Mayfield Singing praises unto "me" . To be a midget in side-show 

Charlie G. Raulen. . . ."Acting" To live in Kinston 

P.uth Skinner Arguing To make Mr. Warren see the 

point 

Reba Stubbs Bluffing To be the first woman president 

Louise Tomlinson Speaking French To take Miss Beach's place 

Lill Winstead Visiting To be Mrs. Heame 

Mae Standi] Making friends To win a beauty contest 



One Hundred Twenty 



r^lne Knot 



iVij 



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I 



Hi 



One Hundred Twenly-one 



Commencement Program 

May 23, S P. AI. — Joint Societ\' Program 

May 24, 11 A. M. — Baccalaureate Sermon — Dr. Crossficid 

May 25, 10 A. M— Senior Class Day 

8 P. M— Recital of School ni Music 

Ma\' 2o, 11 A. M. — Commencement Address 

1 P. M. — Alumni Banquet 



One Hundred Tweiilv-l'ii'O 



T'^. 



The Rebellion of Mrs. Barclay 

A Comedy of Domestic Life 
Presented by the Senior Class 

- Characters 

M orton Barclay Hilton Windley 

Roger Stuart, a neighbor J. Park Nunn 

Dennis O'Hara Parron Gallop 

Ethel Barclay, Morton s icife - Mae Stancill 

Ruth Carter, Ethel's sister Dolly Lewis 

Mrs, Brown, Morton's sister Ruth Skinner 

Cora, her daughter Agnes Cobb 

Elsie Stuart, Roger's sister Vivian Holden 

Mary Ann O'Connor Charlie Grey Raulen 

Act I: The dining room at the Barclays, Tuesday morning in summer. 
Act II : The Barclays' kitchen, the following Friday afternoon. 



II 



n*. 



If! 



One Hundred Twenty-three 



Popular Songs b); College Folks 

"Nightingale" Eloise Bowers 

"Dolly" Dolly Lewis 

"Half Past Ten " Mrs. Moore 

" Who Wants a Bad Little Boyf" Raymond Boucher 

" Yoii Can't Make a Fool Out of Me" John Ross 

"No Means Yes" Mary Etheridpje 

_ " The Only Girl". Ruby Crockett 

" / Love 5 'ou" Clyde Tilghman 

"Hoi Dau'g" Charlie Moore Walker 

"Sitppose I Had Never Met You" Henry Flemming 

" Aly Pal" Lucille Baynes 

" Wild Papa " Dewitte Speir 

" We're Sweethearts" ..Edna Wood, Leman Barnliill 

" Step pin' Out" Jflin Winfield 

"Do You, Don't Yon, Will ]'on, ]]'on't Youf" Louise Stubbs 

"Stop Doggin Me 'Round" Ada Jarvis 

'-'''■ "Let Me Call Yon Sweetheart" Park Nunn 

tf^ ' What Did I Get by Loving Youf" ' Parron Gallop 

1' "I'ou've Simply Got Me Cuckoo" Harvey Underwood 

" / Love Me" Leo Weatherly 

"Wait'll You See My Gal" Charles James 

L "Adoring You " Anderson Boswell 






I 



.1 'H 



"All Alone" Everett Harris 

"/ Need Some Pettin' " Faye Adams 

"Every Night I Cry Myself to Sleep Over \'on" Ruth Skinner 

"Nobody Knoivs But My Pillow and Me" IMary vSue King 



fl 



m 



One Hundred T-a-eniy-four 



w^''::c;iTs:isirt3i?i53! 














ry-i^l . 



il^^^^^^S^5S'5SiSv%&5^c^;-cS;^-^5^-"^^ 




l! 



One Hundred Twcnly-five 



,;■>. 



"1 



I 



A Humorous S\etch 



Some outsiders have deemed ours a sad lot. Would you ever believe it? Well, probably 
it is because they ne\'er visit within our campus limits. We have fun from September to May. 
Who wouldn't laugh on the first da>- of school when the nervous Freshmen take their first les- 
sons in college behavior? It requires equipment to take this course. The Freshman "man" 
must have his stiff straw hat with a red and white polka dot band, a tie to match in yellow, a 
raincoat, an umbrella, and some lunch wrapped in a newspaper, which his mother has fixed for 
him, for fear he will miss his dinner, although his train is due in Wilson at 5:40 A. M. That's 
not unwise, however, because it is a 1-o-n-g way from the N. and S. stopping station to the A. C. 
mess hall. It is a peculiar thing that all Freshmen come from the country and all Seniors are 
city men. The little "man" is surprised when someone suddenly jerks his hat off and tears 
off his red and white hat band. "What right have you to wear Red and White?" are the words 
that ring in his ears until he learns what it is all about. Then he understands, too, that the 
same thing would have happened to the tie had it been blue and gold. 

The evoluting "man" whom we all know as Ick, was soon relieved of his green coat by the 
College Campus Cows.. His mother made him another one of gray, because Ick wrote her that 
y '"Gray is being worn exclusively." He told her that "his old suit was supremely ragged while 

Jl hazing." A return letter offered these suggestions: "Be perticular and don take thet lesson no 

ii more. From all I liear about hazing I don want my boy to haf nothing to do with it. " 

"' Ick made his first visit home (Hinkinville) at Christmas, and even his "Diffie" teased him 

-: about his college air. He seemed above her, somehow. The crust was rebroken, however, 

wi when he presented her with a mirror. " I haven't ever seen anything pretty in one yet, but 

\[ maybe you can. I see all the girls up at the college have 'em and they're always looking in 'em. 

•-] I thought you'd like one. " 

11 Soon after Christmas holidays he took a heavy cold, and on investigation by Charles Kendall, 

( it was discovered that he sacrificed his blankets to keep the radiator warm. Well, 'tis no wonder, 

f because Ick was always so kindhearted. He told Louise Harrison that he hated to impose his 

i weight upon a mule, consequently he had walked five miles to school for four years. 

Ick's second year in school showed that he meant business. He coveted Leman's Edna, 
Harvey's Ada, and many other popular jewels, but he knew no way of approach, so he rushed 
the "new girls." Now, much to his hidden joy, Mary Etheridge, Eloisc Bowers, Faye Adams, 
and even Mary Jones often risked smiles at him. By the end of his Sopliomore year he had 
learned to smoke. He grew a mustache, put hair tonic on his hair, and powder on his face. He 
told his mother that Paul Southard and Oscar Merritt were the cause of his doing that. 

His second summer at home proved the cause of sullen discontent for Diffie. Ick was always 
raving about Lyma's hair, Janie's complexion. Miss Rcmsberg's eyes, or something that she 
didn't have. 

{-i Junior days were different from all others. Ick discovered his popularity liy finding him- 

'-li self a member of the "Puppy Nursers' Club" (Pres. Harvey Underwood), the "Pipe Suckers' 

r'\ Club" (Pres. Park Nunn), the "Ladies First Club" (Pres. Ray Mcllwean), and others of similar 

r-f tyijc. His greatest success in his Junior year \yas a speech made in chapel. His first words 

j[ were, "I can prove evolution to you — just look here." 

Now Ick is a Senior. He has grown above Diffie, and cares little for her, l^ut continues to 
avow his affections for her. His last letter told her that he wished she could be here; that "We 
have ice, steam, or nothing fifteen minutes a day. Only one two-candle power light is allowed. 
I am required to attend two classes a day and one chapel ser\'ice, so I just can't find time to 
write to you but once a day." 

"P. S. Please address your next letter with ink." 

It is hard to estimate the value of what Ick has done here. Xot all of his tracks are in the 
College Square, but he has made many "footprints in the sands of time" around A. C. C. which 
will not be forgotten. 



M 



One Hundred Twenty 



(rS<t B« .» THi 3 



3ie K; 




.&ti.;,ij^SCZ3^S_ 



Speakers of J^ote at A. C. C. 

1924 and 1925 

Edgar C. Raine. noted lecturer on Alaska. Under the auspices 
of the Alethian Literary Society. 

Rev. Peter Ainslie. pastor of the Christian Temple, Baltimore, 
Maryland, held a series of services, sponsored by the Religious Ed- 
ucation Committee. 

Mrs. Marion Leland, reader and entertainer, gave a recital on 
April the twenty-third, under the direction of the Hesperian Literary 
Societv. 






I 



One Hundred Tiuentv-seven 



The Pine Knot '2S 



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H 



1' 



rt 




One Hundred Tu-enly-ei^kl 



lie 

l! !.<-/ 



a 



1 
a 



I 



I'' 
V 



'^i 



l"l 



Humor 



Gc^D Advice 

"Don't be what you ain't; 
Jes' be what you is. 
W • If you is what you am, 

E Then you is not what you 

1^ If you're just a Httle tadpole, 



^( Don't try to be a frog; 

If you're just the tail, 



Don't try to wag the dog. 
Now, you can always pass the plate. 
If you can't exhort and ]jreach. 



jij If you're just a little pebble, 

^-- Don't try to be the beach. 

Don't be what you ain't, 
Jes' be what you is. " 



Mrs. Mattox— " What is a metaphor, Robert?" 
Robert — "To graze cows in." 



Mr. Case — "Who is the first man mentioned in the Bible?" 
^^ Freshman — "Chapl." 



p Henry Flemming — "Can you write shorthand ? " 

H Sallie — "Oh yes, but it takes me longer. " 



Johnnie — "Do you believe there's a devil?" 

Sammie — "No; it's like Santa Claus. It's your father." 

John — "I'll tell you, old man, Agnes is a bright girl. She has brains enough 
for two. " 

Dewitte — "Then she's the very girl for you, my boy." 



Otie Hundred Twenly-nine 



Prof. Warren — "Clem, what is the most important thing you have learned 
in this history course'" 
Clem — "Endurance, " 

Doctor — "I'll sew that scalp wound for you for ten dollars." 
Elsie Peel — "Goodness, Doctor! I just want plain sewin!,,\ not hemstitching; 
and embroidery." 

"Oh, he's not a bad chap. He throws himself into any job he undertakes." 
"Then I wish he'd go and dig a well." 



Mary Harper — "Do you like Beethoven's works, Harvey?" 
Harvev — "Never visited them. What does he manufacturer 



"I wonder why it is a girl can't catch a ball like a man?" 
"Oh, a man is so much bigger and easier to catch. " 



Prof. Case (to students in back of room) — "Can \'ou all hear me back there'" 
Chorus from back row — " No, sir. " 



Mrs. Case — "Leman, what is the difference between the drama and the melo- 
drama ? ' ' 

Leman — "Well, in a drama the heroine merely throws the villain over; and in 
a melodrama she throws him over the cliff." 

Prof. Mattox — "Who was the first Greek to introduce the idea of immortality 
in the soul?" 

Everett—" Pluto. " (Plato) 

Edna — " I showed father the verses you sent me. He was pleased with them. ' 

Leman — "Indeed! What did he say?" 

Edna — "He said he was glad to find that I wasn't going to marry a poet." 

Prof. Warren — "Wh}- were you late this morning. Miss Holden?" 
Vivian — "Why, the bell just rang before I got here." 



!( 



i I 



^: 



V,- ! 







One Hundred Thirtv 



The Pine Knot ' 2 s 



Sunday School Teacher — "Can you tell me who made j'ou, Joe?" 

Joe — "God made part of me. " 

Teacher — "Why, what do you mean by thati^" 

Joe — "He made me real little, and I just growed the rest myself. " 

The Road to Fame 

The heights by some men reached and kept 
Were not attained by sudden flight, 

But they, while their constituents slept. 
Were toiling upward through the night. 



ii 



Louis Mayo (receiving gift of fountain pen) — "Thank you. 
now be able to write better sermons." 
The Lady — " I hope so. " 



I hope I shall 



Kate Brinson — "I'm so happy I can't help breaking into song." 
Alfred Flanagan — "Why don't you get the right key, and then you won't 
have to break in." 



if 



Eloise — "Oh, I wish the Lord had made me a man." 
Al — "He did. I'm the man." 



Prof. Grim — "Why did you put quotation marks at the first and last of 
that exam paper, John ''. ' ' 

John — "I was quoting the man in front of me." 

Teacher — "Who was the strongest man in Rome?" 

Little Boy — "Caesar. He pitched his tent across the river." 



A Comedy in Four Acts 

Act I — Cram. 
Act II — Exam. 
Act III— Flunk. 
Act IV— Trunk. 



ii 



t 



One Hundred, Thirty-one 



A«to9rapl|0 



One Hundred Thirty-two 



h 





J/T^ '^^^w^ilkam- 



It, ■ 

i 



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It 



I 






fc>i 



One Hundred Thirty-three 



I 

If 



I 



Wilson 
Market Co. 

Nos. 109-111 Goldsboro Street 
Phone 172 Phone 415 

WE WANT YOUR TRADE 

If Good, Relial)le Goods, Lowest 
Posisible Prices, Fair and Square 
Dealing, Polite Attention Will Get 
It, We Gun Count on Vou for a 
Customer. 



MnHHEJ^" 



Pharmacists 



Phone 127 Phone 128 

WILSON, N. C. 



Winfickl — "I shall go to your father tonight, darling, and ask his consent. There 
are no grounds on which he can throw me out, are there, dear?" 

Dolly — "Not in front of the hou.se, dearest, but there's a potato jiatch at the hack 
which looks nice and soft." 



Boykin Grocery Co. 

IXCORPOR.\TED 

Distributors of 

ROLLER CHAMPION FLOUR 

BLUE LABEL CANNED GOODS 

GELFAND'S MAYONNAISE and RELISHES 
CORNO and FULL-0-PEP FEEDS 

U. M. C. GUN SHELLS and NAILS 



WILSON 



NORTH CAROLINA 



il 



One Hundred Thirlv-fou 






III 



WILSON 

HARDWARE 
COMPANY 

Leaders in 

HARDWARE 

Building Materials 

and 

Sporting Goods 

Nash Street 

Telephones 18 and 19 

Goldsboro Street 
Phone 289 
WILSON N. 



The Planters 
Warehouse 

WILSON, N. C. 

Sell Your Tobacco Here 

BEST PRICES— 

—FAIR TREATMENT 

B. T. Smith John B. Bruton 

Managers 

E. B. Capps, President 



This old world we're Hvin' in 
Is mighty hard to beat; 

You get a thorn with every rose, 
But ain't the roses sweet ! 



Rverybody 

in Eastern North 

Carolina knows 

it pays to 

deal 

at 




DR. E. D. HARBOUR 

Eyesight specialist with us, lias 
fitted glasses for hundreds of Amer- 
ican soldiers to figlit the world's 
greatest battles. Why not let him 
fit your eyes for life's battles? 

Denny Bros. 
Company 

WILSON'S DEPENDABLE 
JEWELERS 



iltl 



One Hundred Thirty-five 



:ia 



ii 



11^9 



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n. 




Atlantic Christian College 
extends the light of life to 
young men and young 
women of high purpose, 
in offering a Christian ed- 
ucation. Inquiries about 
its courses and life will be 
gladly answered. 

Atlantic Christian College 



WILSON 



NORTH CAROLINA 



jB 



( 7 1 Hundred Thirty-six 



ot 'X5 




Turlington - 
Morrison 

("aroiina's (Greatest Drui; Stent' 

WILSON N. C. 

MODERN 

PRESCRIPTION 

SERVICE 

Seating; capacity for 75 i>eoi)lc a I 
one time at our fountain 

Delivery to all i)ai-ts of the cilN- 

A HEARTY WELCOME 
AWAITS YOl HERE 



Thomas- 
Yelverton Co. 

Better 
FiirJiittire 

Service and Quality 
OiR Motto 

Telephone 58 

WILSON N. C. 

Funeral Director 
Ambulance Service 



IMaytifld — "Ri.ius.seau says that the man who thinks is a deijraved animal." 
John Ross — "Then, I guess I will come out of college virtuous. Say, that guy had 
a kind heart, he knew S'lniething. " 



J. VV. RILEY 
GROCERY 
COMPANY 

Heavy and Fancy 

Groceries 

Telephones 47, 885. 1048. 598 

202-204 Tarboro Street 

WILSON N. C. 



Courtesy 
Service 
Results 

SELL YOUR TOHAf CO 

AM Til 

FERRELL 

Warehouse Co. 

WILSON N. c. 






11 



'Si 



fell 



One Ilundreii Thirty-seven 



M 




^ 



!i 



No. 306— Closed School Bus Body 

Mounted on Ford (Jne-Ton Chassis 
Specifications— Length, 12'6"— ^Yidth, 60"— Height. Inside, 



56' 



TAis is a Metal Panel Body ivith Hardwood Frame 

Rigidly braced, and built by thoroughly expericucod 

mechanics, who have been building 

Bus Bodies for years 

Painting — Brewster Green with appropriate striping. 

Trimmed with best f|uality nude skin. Ecjuipped 

with drop sash, as illustrated in cut. 

It is provided with front and 

rear door controls, 

o])erated from 

the driver's 

seat 

For all-year-"round transi)ortation of school children 
thi.s body is most ideal in every way. Has a com- 
fortable seating capacity for twenty-five children. 

Manufactiued iiv 



HACKNEY BROTHERS 



WILSON 



INCORPORATED 



NORTH CAROLINA 



One Hundred Tliirly-eigJit 







FOR— 




,! 


WILSON 


Real Estate 


J*S 




THEATRE 


or 




3 


Eastern Carolina's Finest 


Insurance 




t- ' 




Call on 




F 


m m 


WILSON 




t ' 


Road Shows 


INSURANCE 
REALTY CO. 




■. 


Vaudeville 


Established 1907 




1 


Pictures 


Geo. T. Stronach, Secy. 




1 
if 




WILSON N. C. 




Freshie — "Do hors 


es bray?" 






Soph — "Neigh, nei 


gh, my child. " 




WILSON 


Adams 




1 


Shoe Store 


Studio 

and 




1 


Shoes 


Art Shop 




r. ' 


Hosiery 


For Quality 




c" ' 


We Fit the Feet at the 


M W 




1 T 

1' 


RIGHT PRICES 


Official Photographer 
for this Annual 




. 1 1 


WILSON N. C. 


WILSON N. C. 




4 












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One Hundred Thirty-nine 



!?ine Knot *2S 



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THE STATE'S GREATEST CLOTHING STORE 




2.23. WAS// Sr 



FOR IVIEIV AND WOIVIEN 



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H 



Randolph (speaking of the basket ball team) — "Now, there's Maytielcl, in a few- 
weeks he will be our best man." 

Louise H. — "Oh, Walter, this is so sudden." 



W. M. 

Wiggins & Co. 

Plumbmg and 
Heati?ig Contractors 

Hot W;iter, Steam and \'ai)(ir 
Heating Systems 

Telephone 891 

Office: Fidelity Building 
WILSON N. C. 



Service 

Shaving Parlor 

('()LKY-T.\VL(il{. I'l<ip. 

I'eii ( DUi'teiius Harliers at \<)ur 
Ser\ici' 

Ladies' and (liildrens Ilaii' Cnttint; 
a Specially 

^oui' Patronaiic Solicited 

Coldsboro Street 

WILSON N. C. 



One Hundred Forlv 



1 1 



ii 



WILSON 

DRUG CO. 

Drugs 

Toilet Articles 

Stationery 

Candy 



WILSON 



N. c. 



Give Us the Privilege of Sewing You 
in the 

Jetve/ry^ Optical 
and Repairing Line 



Churchwell's 



THE QUALITY SHOP 



Prof. Warren — "Is anyone in this class majorin}; in social science?" 
Long John — "I am, but it is getting so hard I may change." 
Prof. Warren — "You're a Suph-o-more, aren't you?" 

Long John — "Yes, suh ! I sure have suffered more in this class than I ever have 
before. " 



H. SUSMAN 

COMPANY 



RICHMOND 



VIRGINIA 



S|)eciah'z(' in 

Food Products 

For Schools, College.s and 
Puhhc Institutions 

35 years commercial life at your 
service 



Quality — 
Not Quantity 




Orange Crush Bottling Co. 
WILSON N. C. 



(;i 



One Hundred Forty-one 



Correct 

Wearing 

Apparel 



For Women and Misses 

MILLINERY AND 
FURNISHINGS 

Barrett- Pat rick 
Company 

Hackney BIdg. Nash Street 

WILSON. N. C. 



G. T. 

Fulghum&Co. 



WILSON, N. C. 



Roofiii{r 

Sheet Metal Work 

Tobacco 

Flues 



Prof. Grim — "Class, why do you come to college?" 
Lawson — "To improve our faculty-s. " 



Centre Brick Wareliouse 

WILSON, N. C. 

For the Sale of Leaf Tobacco 

THE CENTRE BRICK IS THE LEADING 
WAREHOUSE ON THE LARCiEST TO- 
BACCO MARKET IN THE WORLD 

Cozart, Eagles & Carr 

Owners and Proprictfirs 



M 



One Hundred For:v-li^o 



The Pine Kts^H: ''%^ 



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NORFOLK SOUTHERN 
RAILROAD 



Norfolk Southern Railroad operates unexcelled service between 
Raleigh, Goldshoro and intermediate points in eastern North Caro- 
lina. Pullman drawing room sleeping cars are operated between 
Raleigh and Norfolk, serving the following principal stations, viz: 
Wendell. Zehulon, Wilson, Farmville, Green\'ille, Washington, Pine- 
town, Plymouth, Edenton, Hertford, Elizabeth City, Moyock, mak- 
ing connections with other lines at Norfolk, Raleigh and Wilson. 

Pullman buffet parlor cars and drawing room sleeping cars are op- 
erated between New Pern and Norfolk, serving the following prin- 
cipal stations, viz: ^'anceboro, Washington, Pinetown, Plymouth, 
Mackeys, Edenton, Hertford, Elizabeth City, Moyock and inter- 
mediate stations, making connections at New Bern for Goldsboro, 
Beaufort and intermediate points; connecting at Norfolk with all 
connecting lines. 

Low rate summer excursion, week-end and Sunday excursion 
fares are available during the summer season to Norfolk, Virginia 
Beach, Elizabeth City, Nags Head, Morehead City, Beaufort, Jack- 
.son Springs, Aquadale, Norwood (for Rocky River Springs). 

For fares, pullman reservations and any other information, call 
on any Norfolk Southern ticket agent or apply to 

J. F. DALTON, 

General Passenger Agent, 
Norfolk, ^'a. 



One Hundred Forty-three 



Tike Pine Knot *2S 



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Golden 
Gem 

The fertilizer that ))n)- 
duces tobacco of texture, 
color and weight. 

Manufactured hy 

Farmers Cotton 
Oil Company 

WILSON N. c. 



Saj/ it with Flowers 

WE GROW THEM 




Greenhouses Maplewood Ave. 

Phone 234 

Flowers Delivered by Wire to Any 
Address in U. S. A. 



There are some things we don't understand, 

Now take for instance "college" — 
Perhaps it's chance or maybe 'twas planned; 

Why does it rhyme with "knowledge?" 

— .V. Y. Mercury. 



SELL YOUR TOBACCO AT 



The Watson Warehouse 



WILSON, N. C. 

W. P. Anderson 
S. H. Anderson 
W. M. Carter 



IM 



''T 



Wi/soN Farmers Union Warehouse Co. 

TRY us AND WE BELIE^•E 
YOU WILL COME AGAIN 



One Hundred Forty-four 



ill 



ml 

ilili 



The Straus 
Company 

The Largest Equipment House in 
the South 

RICHMOND, VA. 

CHINA 
GLASS 
SILVER 

Complete Installations of Kitchen 
Equipment, Cafeteria, etc. 



G ^Li^VJ^J-^f^- ^i Incorporated 
Corner Nash and Spring Sts. 

MEET PROSPERITY WITH 
THRIFT 

DO YOUR SHOPPING HERE 

WE CAN SUPPLY YOUR NEEDS 



A man is but a worm of the dust. He comes along, wiggles about awhile and finally 
some "chicken" gets him. 



Branch Banking & Trust 
Company 

CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS 



4%- 



$575,000.00 
Paid on Savings Deposits- 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 



4% 



11 



One Hundred Forty-Jive 



Don't Cuss 
Call Us 



RUFFIN'S 

WILSON N. C. 

Gas — Oil — Tires 



'' Where 
Savings 
are Greatest 




Nnsh and Tarboro Stret-ts 
WILSON N. C. 



I'rt'sh — "\\'hi> was tlic smallcsi man in histnry?' 

Soph — "I don't know, who was he?" 

Fresh — "The Greek who slept on his watch." 




Barnes-Harrell Co. 

Wholesale Groceries 

WILSON, N. c. 



Bottlers 

Coca- Cola 

ami 

Cherry Blossom 

Bottled With 
Deep Well Water 



Disf riliiitors 

Saginaw Self-Rising 

and 

Upper Crust 
Plain Flour 

DIAMOND TIRES 

\\'cst(.'rii (iun Shells 



Oyie Hundred Forlv-six 



The Pine Knot '^9 



,jjBssj2assiS3e^5jffi-l2ZEt^ 



F T 

VOLIVA 

Hardware Co. 



INCORPORATED 



BELHAVEN 



N. C. 



Deale 



Hardware, Builders' IMaterial, 
Paint, Glass, Brushes, etc. 

Our Specialty : 

Lime, Cement and Plaster 

Agents for American and Elhvood 
Win- 



SERVICE 
LAUNDRY 



INCORPORATED 



South Lodge Street 



"Don't Kill Your Wife, Let Us Do 
the Dirty Work" 

Call 714 and the Checkerboard 
Truck Will Call 



The professor was discussing the characteristics of a fool's mind. 
Bored student — "What is a fool anyway?" 

Professor — "Long ago someone said, 'He is a fool who asks more questions than 
a hundred wise men can answer.'" 

Another student (triumphantly) — "Now I know why we flunk on so many e.xams. " 

— Michigan Gargoyle. 



W. W. Simms 
Company 



WILSON, N. C. 



Manufacture Lumber of all kinds 

Sash, Doors and Blinds and what- 
ever is needed in the construc- 
tion of your home 

Estimates P'urnished on .\.pi)lication 



Geo. W. 

Stanton & Co. 



All Kinds of Insurance 
and Bonds 



Fidelity Bldg. Courthouse Square 
WILSON. N. C. 



I ill 

b:\\ 

I 



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••1 ! 



U 



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One Hundred Forty-seven 



!§ 



i 



P. L. 

WOODARD 

& COMPANY 

General 
Merchandise 

General Agents 

CONTENTNEA GuAXO Co. 



Telephone 70 



WILSON 



N. C. 



Efird ' J" 



Wilson's Busiest 

Department 

Store 



Chain of 37 Stores 
BIYS IT FOR LESS 
SELLS IT FOR LESS 



Soph — "I saw where three people were killed in a feud." 
Fresh — "Those small cheap cars are always dangerous. " 



Sugg & 

Bridgers 

Electrical 
Contractors 

Radio, Lamps 

and 

Lighting Fixtures 

Telephone 996 

106 South Tarboro Street 

WILSON N. C. 



Fresh Candies Daily 



Phone 178 



Palace of 

Sweets 



SUNDAES: 



Banana Split 
Lovers' Dream 
Wilson Special 
Chocolate Shop 



Sweet Sixteen 
A. C. C. Special 
Palace of Sweets 
Nabisco Sundae 



Fruit Sundae 

Peach Melba Sundae 

Ice Cream Soda 

NICK BOULOUKOS 

Manager WILSON. N. C. 



hi 



One Hundred Forty-eight 



Th 



_;LapS53eaJCi&aC2£sscz&S3C2:&95jeas3&e;.. 



An A 



nnual 



t? 



IS a voor\ of Art — 

the perfection of Boo}{ }Aa\ing 




OR over one-quarter of a cen- 
tury, the creation of better An- 
nuals has been our aim. 

We will help your staff or- 
ganize Its work, help you plan 
your book, advise with your editorial 
and business departments, deliver you 
a beautifully printed and bound book, 
and insure your school a successful and 
satisfactory Annual, of which you can 
well be proud. 

Twenty-five years of service to An- 
nual staffs gives us a broad experience 
which will be of immense value to you. 

THE COLLEGE 
PRINTING CO. 

Louisville, Kentucky 



One Hundred Forty-nine 



y 



1^ 



!^ 




One Hundred Fifty